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Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1923"

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CHESTNVT BVRR 

THE BOOK OF THE YEAR 

1923 VOL. X 



PUBLISHED BY 
THE CLASS OF 1923 



KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 
KENT, OHIO 



• 








' 1 'O commemorate our joys, 
"*• our friendships, and our 
successes; and also to assuage 
the pangs of parting, this memc 
rial volume is most respectfully 
laid upon the altar of our alma 
mater, by 

THE CHESTNUT BURR STAFF 











Page Tiuo 





JOHN EDWARD 
McGILVREY 

our President and our Friend. 

When the College was but 
a wooded ridge he was dream- 
ing dreams and fighting bat- 
tles for its existence. Today 
he is as active for a greater 
and still a greater College. 
In all of his deliberations we 
know our interests are being 
considered, and in every de- 
cision we know our welfare 
has been promoted. 





Page Three 




PRESIDENT .lolIX E. M< CII.VliF.Y 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

David ('. Wills, President Gh veland 

William A. Cliff, Secretary ■ • Kent 

David Ladd Rockwell Ravi una 

Sherwood l>. Shankland. . ■ ■ Willoughby 

William a1. Courson East Youngstown 



Page Four 




Paff*-T?-vv& 




Page Six 




Page Seven 




Page Eight 




Page Nine 




■%..rS; 



Page Ten 




Page Eleven 



Sean of Mnmen 




Blanche H. Verder 

Tn a college of the nature of Kent State, the duty of the Dean of Women 
is to look after all those things in connection with a women student's life that 
are not cared for by the regular classroom instructor. These will include the 
living conditions, and the social relations, together with a keen interest in 
the development of the religious life of the women student. 

Working under the direction of the Dean of Women in Kent are the two 
house mothers of Moulton and Lowry Halls, the dietitian, and the resident 
nurse. Together these form the Dean's Council, which meets regularly to con- 
sider all the matters concerning the women residing in the halls. 

As there are about twice as many women students at Kent State living off 
campus as on, the Dean's major problem is to get into close touch with the 
women who hoard or live at home in Kent, or at home, in nearby towns. To 
accomplish this purpose, an Off Campus Women's Club has been formed, which 
has already done much. In November, the Dean of Women gave a tea to all 
the landladies of Kent who have college women living with them, that they 
might become better acquainted and might better understand their mutual 
relationships and responsibilities. During the winter term, the Dean of Women 
visited the houses in Kent, and made a list of approved rooming places for 
college women students. 

The organized social functions during the year have been many. These, in 
the main, have been the week end parties held in Moulton Hall. Various clubs 
and classes have financed the parties, which have been supervised by the Dean 
of Women and members of the faculty. Most of the gatherings have been "all 
college" women. 

The religious life on the campus centers in the Y. W. C. A. An increased 
interest in the organization is being manifested. The regular time of meeting 
has been changed from Sunday night to Wednesday evening. A religious census 
of the college women was made in the autumn term, and the local clergy were 
given lists of the names of the students who signified a church preference. 
During tin' winter term a series of Sunday afternoon teas was given, to which 
both faculty and students were invited. At each tea, the Dean of Women in- 
vited as special guest some one of the clergy of Kent, who made a short address. 



Page Twelve 



AmirultiuT 




Lester S. Ivins 

The law of Ohio requires that Agriculture be taught in all the elementary 
and high schools of the state in school districts where the population is less 
than 5,000. In districts where the population is ahove 5,000, Agriculture is 
taught as an elective in the high school and as a required subject in the grades. 
In many of the grades where agriculture is elective in city districts the subject 
is taught under the name of Elementary Science. Elementary Agriculture. 
Gardening, General Science. Science, Nature Study or Economic Nature Study. 

The State Department of Education in Ohio has ruled that our course for 
elementary teachers called "Agriculture II" should contain lessons in Nature 
Study. When this nature work was added the elementary course, known as 
Agriculture II, was classed witli the "Arts'* subjects by the State Department 
of Education. The addition of Nature Study work made it possible to give 
students, who expected to teach in villages and cities, the kind of work that 
these school districts required of their elementary teachers in Economic Nature 
Study. 

For the purpose of aiding the teacher of elementary Agriculture in bis 
work the State Department of Education has published a series of courses for 
the elementary schools of Ohio. All these courses are used in classes at Kent, 
where elementary professional work is taken. Students are furnished copies 
of these courses free by the State when they begin their work in the schools. 
Since so much emphasis is placed upon the uniform course in Ohio's schools, 
the college feels it proper to give this course due recognition at the institution. 

Boys' and Girls' Club work in Agriculture is now carried on as a national 
program. Ohio is one of the leading states in this work. It has had such a 
wide and satisfactory development iu Ohio that Governor Donahey, in his first 
message to the legislature, recommended that club work lie properly financed 
by the state. Kent State College has always recognized the work as a means 
of carrying out the project method of teaching in Agriculture and has, there- 
fore, given student's detail plans for aiding this state and national movement. 



Pagr Thirteen 



Art 





Xina S. Humphrey 



Rena. S. Pottorf 



Our Art Department this year has been a series of surprises to those who 
have watched its work. Throughout the entire .year new products have been 
turned out with just enough thorough rapidity to startle Ford into increased 
action. 

It seemed that every student in the school wanted to get into the construc- 
tion class. Miss Humphrey has shown patience and true director's ability in 
managing her construction class. 

A formation of new looms and finished product makes our weaving room like 
unto a combined Carolina Mountain '•home-spun" factory and a color-crying, 
rug-hung harem room in India. Every vacant period in the student weaver's 
life is filled with a "wang" of the shuttle or the "twang" of a broken warp 
thread. 

And our design class is not in the rear of the inarch. Parchment lamp 
shades, true to Mazda ; sanitas table covers ; Batik 'kerchiefs and ties are work- 
ing havoc on the blue eyes of those who are not designers. We see green eyes 
now, instead of the blue. 

Next year we fear that the Art Department will need a few assistants, 
plus an extra room or two, in order to artistically house the on-coming class 
of Juniors who have been acting as foliage in the background of the Art 
Scene this past year. 



Page Fourteen 



Ouratimt 




Paul G. Chandler 

The classes in education have appeared less bored this year than those 
formerly. The present students may wonder at the martyrdom which former 
classes have produced for the cause of the two-year certificate, while those ex- 
perimented on first can get some compensation from the feeling' that their 
trials have to some degree alleviated the burden of those who have followed in 
their foot-steps. Still the mental impulses frequently wander from the topic 
in hand over the sensori-motor arc of pleasanter associations, but with more 
time and research we hope to find what the inviting fields are, whether they 
are thinking of next Friday evening at home or the last Moulton Hall function. 
and then we will, by the process of substitution, project the History of Edu- 
cation into those nerve circuits and finally usurp for it those interesting and 
romantic emotions. 



Page Fifteen 



iEttgltalj 



"in 



Edgar Packard 

The English Department deals with LANGUAGE, than which there is no 
greater subject. Were we deprived of our language, our very thinking would 
cease; we could not retain our wisdom; and our whole civilization, like another 
Tower of Babel, would have to be abandoned. Verily, in more ways than one, 
"In the beginning was the word." 

The English Department deals with the ENGLISH language, than which 
there is no greater. It is the language of the Magna Charta and of the Bill 
of Rights, of Shakespeare and of King James, of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence and of the Constitution of the United States. It is the language of 
the steamboat, the railroad, the tramway, the electric light, the telephone, the 
telegraph, the cable, the typewriter, the cash register, the automobile, the sky- 
scraper, and on and on. It is the language of the sea, and first or second every- 
where on the land ; and it circulates more printed matter than all the other 
languages combined. 

The English Department makes a study of the classics, in which masters 
of language have quickened dead vocabularies into living stories, expressing the 
masterful motives of the race. Stories that tell not only what man has done, 
but. what he has tried to do ; yes. even the dreams of deeds no mortal dared 
to do. 

Finally, the English Department encourages its members to acquire skill 
adequate for present-day demands. First, the demand to be brief and to the 
point. Every day our language goes humming along the wires, clicking through 
the typewriters, crashing through the printing presses, and every act a costly 
one. Language must be reduced to its lowest terms; slang and oaths, hard 
words and foreign phrases, dialects and even polite expressions — all must go. 
And second, the demand to speak some message for human hearts; 
To sound some note from out God's highest heaven, 

To breathe some word to which sad hearts may cling. 
To weave some verse filled with divinest leaven. 
To build some song for angel choirs to sing. 



Page Sixteen 



iExtntBtmt 





Stephen A. Harbourt 



L. W. Miller 



The extension department of Kent State Normal College was organized 
very soon after the establishment 1 of the College. The regular instructors began 
teaching college subjects in the field before the buildings were completed on 
the campus. 

The value of this type of work can hardly be over-estimated. It has offered 
opportunity for many teachers in service to secure professional training. Ex- 
tension instructors cooperate with Superintendents of Schools in the intro- 
duction of standard tests, address community meetings in behalf of bond issues 
and otherwise promote the best interests of work in the communities where they 
are working. 

Prof. S. A. Harbourt and Prof. L. W. Miller are now acting as the regular 
extension instructors for the college. During the first term Prof. Harbourt 
conducted extension classes at Ashland. Mansfield, Akron, Kent, East Liver- 
pool, Toronto, Steubenville, and New Philadelphia. Prof. Miller had classes at 
Sandusky. Norwalk, Elyria, Lorain, West Park. Youngstown, and Warren. 

Prof. Packard held an extension class at Massillon and Prof. Stopher con- 
ducted a class at Canton and one at Lakewood during the first term. 

Students who desire information relative to extension work or work in ab- 
sentia should write to the college for the information desired. 



Page Seventeen 




Henri Boulet 

The aim of the course called "Romance Languages'' is evidently and above 
all to comply with le programme of colleges, universities, and many special 
schools that demand the knowledge of French and sometimes of Spanish. 

Either you must know a foreign modern language or it is not indispensable; 
what difference does that make? Don't forget the "Utile Dulci" of the Latins 
and learn one; and if you have the choice, don't hesitate to take French. As it 
is the most spoken language in the world, after English, you need it to be con- 
sidered refined; you need it for business, you need it for traveling, or just for 
the pleasure of being able to read, understand, and speak this harmonious 
language. 

Apprenez le francais, ma ehere, 'est si fixcile. 

Three steps only : 

1st. The teacher gives you a general little knowledge that enables you to 
bluff those of your friends who do not know a single word of French. How 

easy ! 

2nd. The teacher makes you believe that you really do know something. 
You are so pleased and proud that he has no trouble at all in convincing you. 

3rd. Being able to bluff the non-initiated ones, being able to bluff yourself, 
we come to the third and last stage. You just have to learn a little more and 
show every one, even native French people, that you do master the language 
you were only pretending to know. This is indeed a little more difficult: but 
with the well known intelligence of the Kent Staters! Courage! Allez-v ! 



Page Eighteen 



(Snnirapltij 




David Olso,, 

Until a knowledge of science has given him vision, man walks with unseeing 
eyes among marvels beside which fairy tales are tame. He is unaware that all 
about him, — in the earth under his feet, in the sky above him — there are vast 
forces, working with him in friendly accord, or pitting themselves grimly 
against him. He does not know that the form of his body and the fashion of his 
mind have their far beginnings in times so remote that in comparison man's 
most ancient records were written but a moment ago. He cannot fully realize 
the brotherhood of man, the universal likeness that underlies the transient im- 
press of environment. 

The task of the geography teacher is to give this broader vision. Geography 
is not primarily a study of facts; it is a study of principles around which facts 
may be interpreted. When man once sees himself in his relation to his physical 
surroundings, when he recognizes to what extent his beliefs and his emotions 
are the product of the stage upon which he acts his part, when he learns that 
other nations and other races differ from him only because the external setting 
of their lives is differently arranged, — when he recognizes all mankind as his 
kindred, children of the same great mother, he will lay aside his foolish pre- 
judices and his causeless hatreds. Geography, rightly understood, is one of the 
mightiest of the forces toward peace on earth, good will toward men. 



Page Nineteen 



History nnh Mortal ^rirnrr 





//. D. Byrne 



Eleanor Ann Meyer 



This Department, in common with the various others of Kent State has. 
since the establishment of the school, experienced a gradual growth in student 
enrollment and in the number and variety of courses offered. 

During the past year the Department has undergone reorganization and 
as at present constituted it comprises the work offered by the college in the re- 
lated fields of History, Government, Economics, and Sociology. A student can 
now secure four full years work in the first subject and the present plan is to 
offer at least a year's work in each of the other fields. This will be still further 
increased as rapidly as the growth in numbers and facilities justify. At pres- 
ent the Department is offering a total of twenty-seven courses, five of these — 
History 20A, History 20B, History 29A, Sociology 21, and Sociology 22— 
having been added during the current year. 

Tlie courses in Sociology which are being cataloged will run in sequence 
through the academic year and will be styled Principles of Sociology, Social 
Progress, and Social Programs, respectively. These courses are planned to 
meet the general cultural interests of students but particularly with reference 
to the needs of prospective teachers of sociology in the Junior and Senior High 
Schools of the State, in which the subject is assuming a growing importance. 

As a part of the program of special extension work which was initiated by 
the College last September in order to meet the demands of deserving non- 
resident students, this Department has been offering the following courses in 
absentia: Government 21, Sociology 21, History 20, and History 11. It is 
probable that a few additional courses will lie offered in absentia during the 
ensuing year. 

The increasing number of high school students taking work in the field of 
History and Social Science is highly gratifying. It is the hope of the Depart- 
ment to be able in due time to enroll its fair portion of the students of North- 
eastern Ohio who are interested in these fields of work and to give them as at- 
tractive an offering as any other institution of similar character in the state. 



Page Twenty 



J 



Ham? Ernnomtrs 





Bertha Louise Nixson 



Ruth West 



Do you know that ninety per cent of all girls sooner or later become home 
makers'? Perhaps you do not realize that the work offered in Home Economics 
serves a double purpose. It trains for the teaching of Foods and Clothing in 
the schools, and at the same time trains for the life work of home making. 

We hear much in these days of "Home Atmosphere". Who can better 
create this desired atmosphere than the girl who has studied carefully home 
planning, the suitability of home furnishings, and the systematic management 
of the home? This knowledge will aid us in the furnishing and arrangement 
of one room if we happen to belong to the "ten" per cent. 

Certainly we need to know the AVhat-IIow-and-\Yhere of clothing. It is said 
that ninety-nine women out of hundred lack simplicity in dress. Being well 
dressed often means the knowing of what to leave off. 

The third phase of our work, Foods and Nutrition, is quite essential for 
the maintenance of health. The ability to select wisely one's food is just as 
vital to the one who eats out, as to the one who is fortunate enough to live at 
home. 

"Home Economics is the economical use of material, time and talent." 



Page Twenty-one 



Hanual ©raining 





Clinton S. Van I>< m 



George A. Dumann 



Manual training, to many people, belongs somewhere in the hazy fringe 
of the field of education. Even some superintendents have a very vague idea 
of what manual training really is. This is not to he wondered at when we 
realize that few superintendents have had any real contact with it. Could you 
expect a person who had never used figures in any way to appreciate mathe- 
matics? Even if he had heard lectures about mathematics but had not used 
figures he could not appreciate the value of the subject and its place in educa- 
tion. So it is with manual training. Few superintendents have more than a 
lecture knowledge of manual training. One must experience manual training 
to appreciate it and to realize its proper place in the field of education. 

Manual training is hand work (not woodwork only; so carried on as to 
co-operate with the other subjects in the curriculum in the mental development 
of the child. Stop and consider what part of an adult's time is devoted to 
doing and you will realize why manual training should have fully as large a 
place in education as mathematics or any other subject. 

To instill in ""Kent Staters" — the future superintendents and principals of 
North-Eastern Ohio — a true appreciation of manual training and its place in 
education is the main aim of this department. No student should leave our 
college without taking at least one course in this department. 

The courses offered include work in paper, strawboard. wood, metal, cem- 
ent, and leather and also mechanical drawing and printing. Persons working 
for the degree of B. S. in Education may major or minor in manual training. 



Page Twenty-two 



iHatljrmattra 




Raymond E. Manchester 

In these modern days when the musician speaks of a "Tone Poem;" when 
the artist talks about the "Picture Essay;" when the poet writes prose without 
rhyme, reason, or rhythm; when the prose is both rhymed and timed, when he 
who would "orate" stands before his audience and reads from a manuscript; 
when he who would "read" stands befort his audience and orates; and when 
students major in aesthetic dancing it is with some courage that we admit a 
connection with the Department of Mathematics. We derive some satisfaction 
from the fact that men studied mathematics before the pyramids were built and 
the fact that, even in this "jazzy" present, people keep arithmetics and geo- 
metries tucked away in safe places and even sneak up the back attic stairways 
now and then to study when they discover that it requires more than a fine 
appreciation of a "Tone Poem" or a book of "Free Verse" to pay the rent. 

Perhaps we derive even more satisfaction in cherishing the belief that in 
mathematics we study quite a large part of that universal truth which holds 
the world together. In any event we meet in large sections in Room 36 to dis- 
cuss the best way to teach Willie how to add without biting his tongue off and 
we meet in small sections in Room 35 to talk ways and means of regulating the 
sun, moon, and stars. Now and then some misguided student leaves us to 
fritter away his time in some trivial project but in the main we are a contented 
and unified family pledged to the pursuit of truth, and happy in our knowl- 
edge that sooner or later the world will come to our door to find out whether 
the grocer lost $20.00 or $40.00 when a customer presented a counterfeit bill. 

We are proud of our mathematics laboratory, proud of our equipment for 
studying surveying and topography, proud of our growing pile of original 
papers in the library, proud of the success of our graduates and proud of our- 
selves because we are so proud. 



Page Twenty-three 



MuBVC 





A ii 111 Maud Shamel 



Ora Belle Bachman 



The Music Department has two functions. It offers instruction and enter- 
tainment. The most important work in our school is the preparation of the 
future teacher to know enough of music and how to teach it so that she may 
intelligently help the supervisor of music in her work. The special courses are 
planned to give more advanced work to lay a foundation for special work in 
music supervision. 

The elementary school is used to demonstrate how music is taught and for 
practice teaching for those who plan to do music supervising. This part of the 
work is under the direction of Miss Bachman and it is divided into three divi- 
sions, the elementary, the Junior High, and the Senior High. In the Junior 
High both girls and boys have separate choruses. The Senior High has a girl's 
glee club and a mixed chorus. Students of both Junior and Senior High are 
in the College Orchestra. 

For entertainment special programs were presented at the assembly ex- 
ercises by the Junior Chorus, the Orchestra, the Choir, and children of the 
elementary school. The student entertainment course for this year offered 
Maurice Dumesnil, French pianist, and C. X. Granville, baritone. 

During each week of the winter term a brief story of the life of an Amer- 
ican composer and his" compositions were presented by the students at assem- 
bly. In the spring a series of musical events was presented. The Junior Chorus 
gave an evening of songs. The High School Girl's Glee Club presented an 
opera "Yanki San'' by Harding. The children of the elementary school pre- 
sented an operetta, "The Stolen Flower Queen" by Grant Schaeffer. The girls 
of the special music class gave a musical part of the Baccalaureate service. The 
College Girl's Glee Club sang part songs on the graduation program. 

It has been the custom for several years for former graduates to return 
at commencement to assist on the graduation program. This custom has been 
much appreciated and will be continued. 

It is hoped that a four year course in music may be offered next year. 



Paw Tiuenty-four 



piymral Ottraitnn 




Marie E. Hyde 

The enrollment in the Physical Education Department at the opening of 
the fall term greatly exceeded any previous record. Due to the lack of suffi- 
cient gymnasium space and heavy programs, the girls who had received credit 
in physical education during the summer sessiuis were excused from gym- 
nastics. Heretofore, every girl in school has been compelled to take "gym" 
twice a week, and in spite of the fact that many were excused several hundred 
"marked time" regularly. This is the first term that any credit has been given 
for physical training and the girls, no doubt, felt that they earned it by the 
time their gymnastic note-books were completed. 

During the winter term there were no gymnastic classes but many of the 
girls were out for basketball. A tournament was held in March with the fol- 
lowing teams competing : Off-Campus, College, Juniors, and Seniors. The 
girls on the champion team were awarded the official "K" and the members of 
the other teams were given class numerals. 

We were very fortunate indeed in being able to have Dr. Krape, a local 
physician, give a thorough examination of heart, lungs, and throat of all girls 
in school. This examination proved most helpful and though various defects 
were revealed, there were no particularly alarming cases. 

The children of the training school were given an examination by Miss 
Smith and Miss Hyde and it was most gratifying to find that in general the 
health of the children was much improved. We found many abnormalities, on 
record for the previous year, corrected. 

We won 't mention the difficulties under which we must work now. Rather 
let us look ahead and see what the possibilities will be when that new gym- 
nasium building is a reality. Let us hope that Kent State may have a School 
of Physical Education where both men and women may specialize in the work. 



Page Twenty-five 



•Press 



THE KENT COLLEGE PRESS 

The Kent College Press, organized last fall under the direction of Mr. 
Manchester, opens up a new field of endeavor in this college. Not only is it a 
means for student literary productions but it is a news agency as well. The 
College Press is now a little germ. In five years it will be a country news- 
paper, in ten years it will be a small town tri-weekly, and iu fifteen years it 
will be a Big City Daily. Some folks pay little attention to little germs and 
as a result they purchase closed cars for little doctors. A little germ has a big 
punch. Keep your eye on this little germ. It is a germ with a future. In it is 
a development arranged in geometrical progression. 

THE KENTONIAN 

The Kentonian had its beginning under the auspices of the Senior Degree 
Class. This year it has been revived after having lapsed its publication for 
several years. In its present form it helps to promote the interests of our col- 
lege, to see and appreciate the fine things of our school, to develop our poetical 
and literary spirits, and to get us all thinking and pushing the policies that will 
make Kent State known the State over. 

THE CHESTNUT BURR 

The Chestnut Burr, an annual undertaking, is the book of cherished mem- 
ories. Its mission is to eternize friendships and to ordain a lasting reverence 
for alma mater. 



Page Tiuenty-six 



Stnlnnu 




Ethel Gowans 

What would this world be if it did not throb with life! Life is the thing 
that is vital The science of Biology gives to us a knowledge of this life, of the 
flowers and trees, and of the creatures of the earth. With the great biologists. 
we are learning the fundamental principles of living matter. To us a frog be- 
comes similar to a leaf. 

We are looking through the microscope, beholding a world as wonderful as 
the one in which we live. There is something fascinating about watching the 
little amoeba at its work and knowing that all life works on the same prin- 
ciple. The little bacteria and yeast plants certainly prove the theory that there 
is strength in numbers. 

Through all the various stages of animal life, we come to a study of the 
human body. Health is the first requisite to success and happiness. In order 
to keep well we must know about the human mechanism and the laws of hygiene. 
Students of Kent State will not soon forget the work of the nucleus and the 
value of exercises and correct posture. 

We have an opportunity in biological science to teach the little ones of the 
nation about the living things of the earth so that they may help to make it a 
better place in which to live. People will then see the vegetable kingdom 
clothed with a new glory and the animal kingdom as the greatest handiwork of 
nature. 



Vi"( T'jienty-seven 



OIIjrmtHtnj mb pjgBtrs 




C. F. Bumold 

The Department of Chemistry and Physics at Kent State Normal College 
stands for acquisition. The content and requirement for credit in all the 
courses are such that those who complete them stand on an equality with the 
men and women who have completed courses in the best colleges and univer- 
sities. The courses are organized and taught in such a way that the student 
who expects to teach shall acquire not only a store of knowledge and a method 
of presentation for the teaching of these sciences, but also a fund of enlighten- 
ing information by which to correlate his own observations and so amplify and 
enrich his teaching of other subjects. Students preparing to enter the medical 
profession and other scientific pursuits will find the courses exactly suited to 
their needs. The Laboratory facilities are unexcelled and much emphasis is 
placed upon Laboratory work. It is possible to do four years of work in Col- 
lege courses in Chemistry and one year in College Physics. 

Special methods courses for teachers of Science are always open during 
the Summer Quarter. These courses are sufficiently elementary so that they 
can be directly transferred to use in the High Schools. They give drill in in- 
genuity of devising apparatus and indicate the scope of the work to be done. 

The Department sends greetings and good wishes to the many students 
who have gone out from its class rooms. There is always a warm welcome for 
all students who believe in work and in the power of mastered skill and knowl- 
edge. 



Page Ticcniy-ciqht 



QmttyrB atrauttttjg 




EMMET C. ST( »PHEE 



EDITH OLSON 





CHARLES F. KOEHLER 



MAY H. PRENTICE 



The Training School of the Kent Normal College is organized as a typical 
public school system. The Superintendent of the Training School has general 
supervision over the four divisions of the Training School — namely, the Senior 
High School, the Junior High School, the Elementary School and the Kinder- 
garten. Each of the first three divisions has a Principal who spends as much 
time supervising the work in his department as his other duties permit. The 
head of the Kindergarten Primary Department supervises the work of the 
Kindergarten. 

The Principal of the Elementary School has no regular teaching assign- 
ment in the Training School and spends considerable time in supervision of the 



Page Twenty-nine 




FRANK X. HARSH ISABEELE HAZEX NORA O'ROTJRKE 






MAUDE I.. VAX ANTWERP 



mirth; mabee 



BESS RIDER 



work of the six grades in this department. A very large part of her time is 
spent in connection with her duties as ''Director of Practice Teaching" in the 
Elementary School. The Director of Elementary Practice and the Superin- 
tendent of the Training School teach in the educational department of the 
college during the year and thus help to promote a working relationship be- 
tween the theory and practice of teaching. Several of the training school su- 
pervisors have taught classes in the college during the second half of the sum- 
mer quarter when the training school has not been in session. This has helped 
to promote co-operation on the part of the training school and such depart- 
ments as Education, English, History. Geography and Mathematics. At times. 
various heads of departments have for a short period of time taken direct 
charge of training school classes. This offers a rather unique opportunity for 
the college instructor to keep in direct touch with actual school room conditions. 
Theoretically, the head of the college department acts in an advisory capa- 
city with reference to the work in his subject in the training school. At the 
present time an instructor in the college department either teaches or super- 
vises the special subjects such as Home Economics. Manual Training. Music 



Page Thirty 




ELSIE MABEE 



ADA HYATT 



IDA. C. JACOBSON 





CLARA D. HITCHCOCK 



MAUCAKKT JEFFREY. 



HERTA HEBERLEIX 



and Art. Responsibility for supervising the rest of the work rests with those 
directly connected with the training school organization. However, all college 
instructors are urged to visit the training school and make such comment or 
suggestions as they wish to make. The training school is used very largely for 
observation purposes — that is, classes in the college come to the training school 
to see demonstrated different methods which have been presented to them. 

Largely for the sake of the children in the training school, students are 
not permitted to do practice teaching until the last year of their course. This 
means that students taking the elementary normal course teach during their 
second year while those working for the degree usually do not teach until their 
fourth year. Students are not permitted to teach in the high school earlier 
than the fourth year unless they are recommended for the work by the head 
of the college department, in the subject in which the teaching is to be done. 

The Training School may properly be called the center of the college work 
in the sense that the student is encouraged to look forward to teaching as proof 
of the adequancy of his training. Work in this department is also the best 
indication of a student's ability to render efficient service in the schools of 
Ohio. 



Page Thirty-one 



IGtbranj 





mai;<;ai;i:t dinear 



1SABELLE DFXBAR 



"As friends and companions, as teachers and consolers, as recreators and 
amusers, books are always with us, and always ready to respond to our wants. 
We can take them with us in our wanderings, or gather them around us at our 
firesides. In the lonely wilderness, and the crowded city, their spirit will be 
with us, giving a meaning to the seemingly confused movements of humanity, 
and peopling the desert with their owu bright creations." 

— Langford — Praise of Books. 

One of the most lasting friendships that we cultivate in our college life is 
the one that we make with our library at Kent State. It is a refuge for all book 
lovers. It is a quiet and orderly workroom for all students. It is a place 
where service is always prompt and pleasant. Our librarians are constantly 
giving of themselves for the enjoyment and benefit of our students. 

It is the many little services which make our library so delightful to us all. 
During the "Children's Book Week" they gave us a most charming display of 
children's books. Every holiday we find a truck which has volumes of books 
and articles appropriate for the occasion. 

Misses Margaret and Isabel Dunbar have been the moving spirit, guiding 
and directing the policies of the library for the best interests of our alma 
mater. Few of us know the tremendous service they have rendered to the 
schools outside of our own and the help they have given to various clubs in our 
district. 



Page Thirty-two 



Sormttories 




Isabelh C. Bt 



M if tie Smith 



Nellit Penoyt 



Life in Mouitoii ! How many fond recollections does that bring hack! 
Study-hour, spreads, "quiet", suggest only a few of our varied activities. 
Moulton was our home. We truly lived there, and Mrs. Bourne was looked 
up to as our Mother. Under her kind and helpful guidance, we lived in the 
right way. When we unfortunately became ill. Miss Smith was always near 
to comfort us back to health. Every nook in Moulton means a story to us. 
Every room means a friend and every brick represents an experience. There vve 
cultivated life-long friends, and there we learned "there's a little bit of good 
in the worst of us". 

Lowry Hall to the Moulton girls meant a place where they tread three 
times a day to eat. Then our song of grace comes back and Miss Penoyer's 
thoughtful face. To the girls who lived in Lowry. their hall meant much the 
same as Moulton did to its inmates. In Lowry, however, the small number 
made it possible for intimate relationships among all the girls. Here Miss West 
officiated as Head Resident and willingly took part in all of Lowry 's social 
affairs. 



Page Thirty-three 




Page Thirty-jour 




Page Thirty-five 




MILDRED CHRISTINE COOK 

Kent. 

President, Chestnut Burr, Y. W. C. A.. Kent 

College Press. 

'•'Cookie' makes Socrates seem like a fool." 

(Itll.I.A BELLE THOMAS 

I ollins. 

Vice President, Chestnut Burr, Kentonian. 

Council, Y. W. C. A.. Lit. Club, Indoor Outer. 

Social Science Club. 

"Wlutl man dare, I dure." 

r,At"RAMARIE WEGMAN 

Kent. 

Kentonian, Kent College Press. Social Sci- 

;e Club, Sec. 

"Honors come by diligence:' 

FRANK L. H06UE 

Kent. 

Social Science Club, Treasurer. 

"Taste the joy thai sin-inns from labor." 

JOHN II. BROWN 

Fresno. 

Blue and Gold Debating Club, College Choir. 

"Always a good student and a hard worker." 

CHARLES P. HOFFEE 
I >ellroy. 

Social Science Club. 

"The sincerity and marrow of the man 
readies to his sentences." 

WM. G. HOPPER 

Andover. 

Kentonian. College Choir. Social Science 
Club. 

■■ ill the //reel nun ere dying and I don't feel 
well myself." 

NELLIE FOREMAN McGEE 

Caldwell. 

Chestnut Burr, Lit. Club. 

"Wire silence golden, I'd be a millionaire." 



Page Thirty-six 



ALICE CATHERINE BEANE 






East Liverpool. 






Home Economies Club, Lit. 


'lu 


i. Social 


Chairman. 






"Her voice was ever soft, gentl 


e, u 


nd low- 


an excellent thing in woman." 






EDITH OLSON 






Kent. 






"Virtue is lilt a rich stone— he 


n i> 


lain set." 


FRANK RICHARD MOORE 






Kent. 






BLANCHE SWENSON 






Coeur'd Alene, Idaho. 






"Thy modesty is n candle to thy 


UK 


ritr 


HAZEL CLARE HEWITT 






Newton Falls. 






Kentnniaii. Lit. ( 'lull. 






"Quiet and unassuming, yet so 


UIH 


lie." 


LVI.E G. KENNEDY 






Ravenna. 






"On their oxen merits, modest mi 


II (I 


■e dumb." 





Page Thirty-seven 




KATHRYN BIETZ 

Kent. 

"She is as good as she is learned." 

HELEN BRYANT 

Kent. 

"Of clear conscience and upright." 



GLADYS COWDERY 
Xiles. 

"For she was just the quiet kind whose na- 
tures never vary." 



DOROTHY HILDITCH 
Bedford. 

"She carries a message to Garcia." 

MARIE FREDA KLLOW 
Hubbard. 

"A maiden fair with talents rare." 

EDNA LIMBACHER 

"1 urn sure, care's an cueing to life." 



ANNA MARIE SADLER 

Twinsburg. 

"By her ways ye shall know her. 



MARGARET E. STEWART 
Youngstown. 

".I golden girl in lining irags.' 



Page Thirty-eight 



ISABEL FRANCES CHANDLER 

Niles. 

"She artistically divides her linn between 
Art and Pat." 

LUCILLE SHARPE 

Ashtabula. 

Y. W. ('. A.. Women's League. 

"We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not 

breaths." 



ESTHER WATTLEWORTH 

Cleveland. 

■•(jut of tin American Beauties." 

WINNIGENE WOOD 

Shiloh. 

"A quiet tiiix of good, active girlhood" 



CLARISSA FLOWERS 

New MUford. 

"She it'n s tin ordinary thing in the extraor 
iiiunrii way." 



RUTH CARLSON 

Ashtabula. 

"iliilvs you think of peaches and cream." 



HELEN CHRISTINA JOHANNSEN 
Wakeinan. 

"A guardian angel o'er life presiding, duu- 
bling pleasures and runs dividing." 



BERTHA JONES 

"Believes in being mi time." 




Paye TIrirty-nine 



foniiir iegra 



We, as graduates of the four-year course represent Kent State's finished 
product, the acme of perfection, as it were. In numbers, we surpass all pre- 
vious classes. In leaders, we have been blessed with the administration of a 
most efficient president. For oratorical propensities we can give you more. 
When it comes to mathematical ability and performances we can furnish you 
the best in the school. For editorial ability and business management we have 
proved our worth. When it comes to staging an impromptu play or act in the 
auditorium we have shown our resourcefulness. 

We are proud of the record that we are leaving behind us, and trust that 
it will serve as an impetus to the classes that will follow. 

For four years we have labored at this and that and now we receive our 
degrees, some of us in spite of ourselves. 

Gladly have we learned and now eladlv will we teach. 



Page Forty 




Page Forty-one 




RUTH ELIZABETH BAKER 

Couneatit. 

President Class of '23. 

"She is pretty to walk with, witty to talk 

with, and pleasant to think about." 

MARY 0. BISSELL 

Aurora. 

Chestnut Burr. Y. TV. C. A.. Vice President 

Class of '23. Lit. Club, Indoor Outer. 

"She is a rival to sunshine itself." 

L. JANICE MOORE 
Oswego. New York. 

Secretary. Chestnut Burr, Y. TV. C. A.. In- 
door Outer, Dramatic. 

"Xime Incir thee hut to love thee. 
None named tliee but to praise." 

JANET M. PROCTOR 
Canton. 

Treasurer. Chestnut Burr. O. C. dub. 
"go icise, so uomig, she cannot live lono — 
single." 

MARY T. KAIFER 

Youngstown. 

"Too sweet is she to stay long in the teaching 
profession." 

NETTIE BRINK 

Ashtabula. 

"To charm, to strengthen and to teach." 

ETHEL CARROLL 

New Philadelphia. 

"Wisdom conies to no one b.u chance." 



MARY E. TVOLCOTT 

Kent. 

"And even her failings lean to virtues' side. 



Page Forty-tiao 



LOIS E. BARKER 

Greenwich. 

"To know tier is to love her." 



CHRISTINE RITH BARNES 
Shiloh. 

"No one is wiser for wit and wisdom arc born 
with a person." 

MILDRED F. BATES 
Amherst. 

"There's a rein of mirth beneath her air of 
dignity." 



FLORENCE E. BEATY 

Ashtabula. 

"7 don't talk very much, but l think a lot." 

SUSIE MAE BLEaDINGHEISER 
Ravenna. 

Secretary O. C. Group. 

"She pushes nit that's quite worth while, in 
h.er clever way with always a smile." 



MARION BOYD 
Elyria. 

"I'm just foolish about that stuff they call 
love." 

EDNA PEARL BREMER 

Massillon. 

'"Tis the songs ye sing, ami the smiles ye 
near, that's making the sunshine every- 
where." 

EUNICE M. RREWSTER 

Perry. 

"Reason is tlie life of tlie lau\" 




Page Forty-tJir 




MARY E. BEITMAX 

Canton. 

"To know love is to live' 



MARGUERITE M. BROWN 

Ravenna. 

"Street mercy \s nobility's true badge. 



ANNE MARIE RIMER 

"1 icould applaud thee to the very echo, that 
shftuld applaud again." 



MARTHA V. CHENEY 
Dundee. 

■7 do not set mi/ life nt a pin's fee." 



HAZEL ALBERTINE CORBETT 

Kent. 

Dramatic Club. 

"My work and I are great pals." 



ELIZABETH DAVIS 

Youugstown. 

'•My own thoughts ure inn companions." 



AGNES P. DONALDSON 

Mechanicstown. 

"Sword of common sense, our surest gift." 



BERTHA DRIVER 

Lorain. 

"Xotliing is so hard tint search will find it 

Ollt." 



Page Forty-four 



MAYME ATTERHOI.T 

Leetonia. 

"A laugh is worth a thousand tears in any 

market." 



ELSIE MAE EDDY 

Mentor. 

"Modesty's a canilh to merit: 



MABEL E. EDWARDS 
Youngstown. 

^."Something attempted, something done, 
lias earned the night's repose." 



FREDA S. FEDER 

Cleveland. 

"Work! (Hi. I can't be worried!" 



HALED': FITZSIMMONS 
Negley. 

"I make no noise, but I get my money's 
worth." 



ESTHER FLOCK 

Cleveland. 

"What is wot /.■ in my timing H 



MYRTLE GIBBS 

Akron. 

"1 wish you all that one can wish." 



FRANCES ALMIRA GREEN 
Hudson. 

"A wealth of knowledge, f -mi— frivolity nil 




Page Forty-five 




KATHRYN GRIER 

Cleveland. 

"The embodiment of perpetual motion." 

DORRIS L. HALLIWELL 

Everett 

"//(•/• sweet smile gains access everywhere." 

GERDA TRAXBERG HANSEN 
Painsville. 
Senior chorus. 

"Her good nature brings her friends from 
everywhere." 

NETTIE E. HAYELK'K 

Sandusky. 

-A woman of Sicilian worth." 

MABELLE MILDRED HEISER 

Atvrater. 

Girl's Glee Club, Orchestra. 

"Quiet, reserved and studious." 

.MARY ELIZABETH IMMEL 

Marshallville. 

"She has only one fault — her quiet, winning 



ELIZABETH MARY .TONES 

Tyrrell. 

Woman's League. Indoor Outer, Girl's Glee 

Club, Choir. 

"Her eyes, in heaven, ivottld through the air;: 

region stream so bright, 

That birds would sing and sing, and think 

it acre not night." 



ETHEL MAE .TONES 

Girard. 

"Blushes arc the rainbow of modesty." 



Page Forty-six 



EDNA M. JOHNSON 
Ashtabula Harbor. 
Women's League. 

"She keeps the sunshine ever before her. tin 
shadows fall behind,." 

EVELYN CATHERINE JONES 

Girard. 

"Results are inevitable." 

RUTH LUTHERIA JONES 

Ravenna. 

Choir. 

"With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles 



ELEANOR ALBERTA KRATJSS 

Warren. 

"Men and good times arc all that is necessary 

tn make me happy." 

ANNA LANESE 

Cleveland. 

Basketball. Indoor Outer. 

"She looks so meek and is not meek at all." 

GEORGIA B. LAPPIN 

Canton. 

"iter studies never suffer from lack of appli- 
cation." 

ANNE LEWIS 
Warren. 

Moulton House President. Women's League 
Basketball. 

"That girl had all her nine lives compacted 
nil in our. Jupiter, but she was life itself!" 

GERTRUDE ALEXANDRIA LYON 

Cleveland. 

"J count no hours bid the sunny ones." 




Page Forty-seven 




MAE McKINLEY 
Hayesville; 

Basketball, Indoor Outer. Choir. 
"She's nil my fancy painted her; 
She's lovely, she's divine." 

ANNA GRACE MAC-KLIN 
Petersburg. 

Indoor Outer. Y. W. ('. A. 
"Do your duty imthout regard for what i>eoi>le 
mini say," 

EMMA ('. MOODY 

Ravenna. 

•■I illustrate the possibilities for a future" 

ANNA ADDIS NEWTON 
East Palestine. 

"The gentleness of all the gods go with 
thee." 

FRANCES M. ORT 
Coshocton. 

Basketball, Indoor Outer. 
"Be good <ni<l you'll be happy, but you'll miss 
a lot of fun." 

MRS. FRANKIE PATCH 
Welshfield. 

"She and school teaching were just meant 
for each other." 

THELMA It. PROEHL 

Ravelin;!. 

"Such sweet compulsion doth in music lie." 



Al YERGNE G. PROPER 

Wffloughby. 

"Kindness in another's trouble, 

Courage in h.er mm." 



Page Forty-eight 



PAIL COLLINS PACKARD 
Kent. 

Current Event, Chestnut Burr, Tress, Three 
Black Stars. 

JEAN ETHEL HABTENSTEIX 

Youugstown. 

Pres. '22, Press, Dramatic, Indoor Outer, Lit. 

Club. 

"Love -will conquer at the last." 

LI'CILLE MAY ESCIILIMAX 
Bowdil. 

"She hath a gentle tongue, a splendid thing 
in women." 



WILMA L. KIRKBRIDE 

Deerfield. 

"Quiet and unassuming is she." 

LUCILLE RIEDIXGER 

Kent. 

"Fashion, so slender and fair." 



GLADYS ROBINSOX 
Cuyahoga Falls. 

"'Gainst whom the world can not hold argu- 
ment." 



IREXE EVELYN SABIX 
Atwater. 

"Then conquer vho lielieve they can. 



LCCIEX BLACK 

Pulaski. 

Chestnut Burr. 

"Him all admire, all pay him reverence due." 




Page Forty-nine 




BESSIE B. ROBINSON 
East Liverpool. 

•■Street simplicity penetrates unconsciously 
very deep." 



GRACE MBRWIN ROBINSON 
Pqrtstown. 

" "I'iriis l:in o'leingdom to look on sech a 
blessed eretur." 

LEILA B. SHORT 
Elyria. 

"Short by inline, but not by nature." 



HELEN M. SHATTUCK 
Cleveland. 

■77/ be merry, I'll be free, I'll be sad for 
nobod.ee." 



MAE M. SLATER 

Creston. 

'."'Women of few words are best women." 



GLADYS F. SJIITH 

Ravenna. 

"By diligence she wins her tray." 

ELINOR CLARETTA STAIFFER 

Ravenna. 

"In youth and beauty wisdom is but rare.' 



SAIMA M. SOPANEN 

Dorset. 

"And, irlieu a gentleman's in the case, you 
knoio all other things give place" 



Page Fifty 



ALICE LUCILLE ROBERTS 

Greenwich. 

■■Let mildness ever attend my tongue." 



EDNA V. SAWTELL 
Conneaut. 

■'She has a limit to resolve, a head to cor, 
trive inn! a hand to execute." 



ELSIE P.. IIODES 
Xoungstown. 
"Fairest of tin fair." 



HARRIET E. SARBAOH 

Cuyahoga Falls. 

"Come Un- in inn heart and pay no rent.' 



MARY KATIIERIXE SCIII'LTZ 
Dalton. 
Basket Bull. 

"Any our ran till sin lias wheels in her limit 
tin tin spokes t/uit come out of her mouth." 



ELIZABETH H. THOMAS 

Youngstown. 

"Ay legacy is so rich as hpnesty." 



DOROTHY E. WESTON 

Cuyahoga Falls. 

"Smooth runs tin- water where tin: brook is 
deep." 



MARY R. WILSON 
Gambler. 

"I hold mil own opinion." 




Page Fifty-one 




MARY B. THOMAS 
Youngstown. 

"Of all treasures fair to see, a tiny ring is 
the thing for me." 

VIRGINIA ANABEL THUOG 
Youngstown. 

"Never do today wliat you can put off till 
tomorrow." 

FLORENCE LILLIAN WADSWORTH 
Cuyahoga Falls. 
Glee Club. 

■\1 little too icise, they say. do ne'er live 
long." 

YIXXIFTTA J. YWVRNER 
Cortland. 

Indoor Outer, Y. \Y. C. A. 
"If success is anywhere I will assuredly have 
it. for I knoir no obstacles." 

AMELIA WEIDNER 
Toronto. 

"Gaiety is the soul's health." 



MYRTLE M. WILHELM 
Leetonia. 

"A daughter of the gods, dirinely tall and 
most divinely fair." 



1ZORA WOOD 

Sliiloli. 

"Gentle in manner; firm in reality.' 



MARY <i. WILLIAMS 
Youngstown. 

"Who does not knoic the bent of women's 
fancy." 






Page Fifty-two 



ELIZABETH CORBETT 

Cuyahoga Falls. 

O. C. Club, Dramatic Club, Women's League. 

"Courteous tho gov, and gentle tlio retired." 



LAURA LEWIS DAVIS 

Seville. 

•"Original', 'Witty', 'Wise'— One girl in 
hundred." 



ELSIE IIAYXES 
Marion. 

"So long as what might have been isn't, why 
worm your head about it."' 



MARION GRACE JOHNSTON 

Ashtabula 

"Frivolity and depth line dwell tide bit side." 



MARGARET KENASTON 

Youngstown. 

"Peg wins her way into the hearts of all.' 



mary k. Mcintosh 

East Liver] 1. 

"When mil mind is made up— that's nil.' 



LILLIAN NEUENDORF 

Brecksville. 

"Sow fluent niclcles from her tongue." 



IK >SETTA O'CONNOR 

Lorain. 

"She touches but the ivory keys, and loi 



tin 



'•// keys have souls." 




- 



Page Fifty-three 









BnxwrB 


ACKWORTH, E. P. 


KONICEL. EMMA 


Ivenl 


Chardon 


ARNOLD, PEARL 


KRAFT. MARIE 


Cleveland 


Martins Ferry 


BEIL, FLORA 


LEASURE, MARY 


Holloway 


Cleveland 




McCRACKEN, DOROTHY 


BETZOLD, BARRIE 


Cleveland 


Bedford 






MARSILIA. FRANCES 


DOUP, JULIA 


Salem 


Butler 






MERRELL, EDYTHE 


DUNLAP, H ATT IE 


Ravenna 


Utico 


MOVER, MARVEL 


EVANS, LOTA 


Chardon 


Massilon 


DHL, BERNICE 


FOWLER, JEAN 


Akron 


Martins Ferry 


PITKIN. CHRISTINE 


FRITZ, BEULAH 


Ravenna 


E. Palestine 


POLEY, LYDIA 




Cleveland 


GRIER. Elinor 




Cleveland 


PORTER, MARGERY 




Eagleville 


HILLARD, ROSA 




Atwater 


SCHAEFFER, BERTHA 




Valley City 


JOHNSTONE, MAUDE 


SIMONS, LORETTA 


Cleveland 


Loraine 


KAMELLIX, TOBY 


TOMPKINS, C. C. 


Cleveland 


Madison 


G-EOY, L. E. 


WEIKART. RUTH 


Wellsville 


Canfield 


KLEIN. FLORENCE 


WHYTE, DAISY 


Cleveland 


Shadyside 



Pai/e Fifty-four 



^ntiors 



Buckeyes in Ohio ! Graduates of the Class of '23 of Kent State! Our 
class proudly boasts of that distinction, and stands ready to combat any con- 
demnation against our alma mater. 

Two years ago we entered and brought with us certain principles, certain 
ideas, and certain standards. It is hardly necessary to suggest that these qua- 
lities differed in every individual, some high, some low, others in a mediocre col- 
umn. Still with all these different views on life, our class had one thing in com- 
mon — the aim to teach the rising generation some day in the future. We at- 
tended Kent State to find out and understand the philosophy of others and to 
profit by their errors. We watched the class of '24 as they solemnly received 
a scroll from President McGilvrey, and wondered; to us it seemed a time for 
rejoicing. 

Now the class of '23 is leaving Kent State, but a casual glance will he 
sufficient to show that the intrinsic value of every member is no longer the 
same. Kent State has justified itself. Our ideas have become broader, our 
information more extensive, our standards more fixed and our ideals higher. 
"Give and take" has been our motto. Unconsciously we have given our best 
and made every effort to take the most. 

Our class may be truly called a cosmopolitan conglomeration, for we have 
classmates from many lands. They have helped vastly to make our visions 
more comprehensive. It was they who supplied the Kentonian with interesting 
and often unique autobiographies. 

The class of '23 will ever laud the praises of K. S. X. C. 

We shall always strive to commemorate her name and spirit. 

Our Alma Mater will never cease to be an inspiration. Zealously, we shall up- 
hold the scarlet carnation, and make its flaming color seen, from coast to coast, and 
gulf to sound. 



Page Fifty-five 



^atrnna nf % '23 GUfratmtt lurr 

Most staffs have selected as their patrons the new-born babe in the college, 
the professor most renowned, the student deserving highest honors, the glorious 
past of accomplished wonders, the bright future of hidden prospects after ful- 
filled promises, the milestones built by the expected yet unbelievable achieve- 
ments of the Alumni, some unusual feature of the year's life, some one whose 
enthusiastic help has made this book possible, or even at time to the staff itself. 

Very appropri- 
ately, this volume 
of the Chestnut 
Burr might have 
requested the spir- 
itual guidance of 
any of these. In 
order to present 
evidence in sup- 
port of the above 
assertion we offer 
the following : 

W hat m o r e 
charming than to 
• " Bobbie ' ' Byrne ! 

To whom more 
deserving than to 
L. S. Ivins and 
Miss Prentice ! 

How more selec- 
tive than to Hazel 
Hewitt ! 

Dark i — Never — Our Gold Stars — Summer Enrollment- 
Dim ? No. — Gymnasium — A.B. — MeGilvrey. 

When more suitable than to Robinson, Fletcher. Crow, and Thomas. 

Is it not feasible to the Silver Foxes, the Cannon, the White Horse, and 
Timothy Moulton. 

"Where more permanent than to R. B. Manchester. 

What more conventional than to the staff itself. 

This voice of the '23 Year Book hears a different echo than any of the 
above. It discovers it has spoken a unique theme in an appeal tuned to its 
dynamic spirit. The Chestnut Burr takes this opportunity to announce that it 
has selected Mr. Strayer and Mr. Englehart to act as the Patrons of this 
Edition. As individuals, the motivated Burr is entirely ignorant of the ability 
of these gentlemen. But as beacon lights in the field of education, the staff 
feels that they very truly symbolize that for which our institution was founded 
and hence are most certainly entitled to serve as Patrons of Our Year Book. 

How many times has Strayer 's "The Teaching Process" been memorized? 
How many outlines have the writings of Englehart provoked? The works of 
these men most assuredly play a prominent and permanent part in the college 
life of a Kent State Student. Their patronage should make Kent State proud 
of all she has done and guide her on to better things. 

After a study of the life and works of men such as Strayer and Englehart, 
it is little wonder that the graduates of Kent State enter their chosen field of 
endeavor with the spirit of Van Dyke. 




-One of First Eight. 



"This is my work, my blessing, not my doom. 
Of all who live I am the one by whom 
This work can best be done in the right way. 
Then shall I see it, not too great or small, 
To suit my spirit and to prove my power. 



Then shall 1 cheerful greet the laboring hours,. 
And cheerful turn when the long shadows fall. 
From eventide to play and love and rest 
Because I know, for me, my work is best." 



Page Fifty-six 




Page Fifty-seven 




Page Fifty-eight 




4* ^^* 




H.Bovv, 



J.L BiUel 






LRayot 







H.CooUdc 



hcst 





K.A.Chap 




* 




M.J Cole 



■«Ar'' ' 



TE.Coil.os 




E.GfeT^termaKer 





MG.bs 



M.A Herbert 



R.M C Dowel! 




I' 



M.Ja 




Apfta-shner 



EIIWkII. 







• Moffltt 



A.ShS 



F.E.I 



k so 



M-LSnyieT 



M,SpHci 



> 



/ 5 «i7c Fifty-nine 




Page Sixty 




P.uje Sixty-one 



'* 



B.RA* 





M. MTPnelan 



R.M.BHo 





E.F.Bik6. 



!* 



.S.Griffith 



Chamberlain 





M.WSshbu 




Pa<7<' Sixty-titio 







3 

O Vance 






n&jt 



J. R.eWefs 




Prt(7c Sixty-three 



•JlmttorB 



ADDICOTT, DONNA 
ALEXANDER, MAUDE 
ANDERSON, ESTER 
BLOUGH. EDNA 
BREYLEY. WINONA 
GLADDING. BETH 
CAIN. HELEN 
GOHLKE, MILDRED 
CAMPBELL, HARRIET 
CAMPBELL, LOIS 
COCHRAN, MARY 
COLE, WILBUR 
COLLINS, MARIAN 
CRAMER, ORREL 
CRAWFORD, MARCIA 
CROMBLE. EVA 
CULVER, IRMA 
DALRYMPLE, LORA 
DAVIES, FRANCIS 
DAVIS. ELIZABETH 
EGING, FRIEDA 
ELLERIN, CECILIA 
EVERHART. BERNICE 
FIRSTER, FLORENCE 
FISHER, FANNIE 



GESSEL, ERMA 
GREENE. MILDRED 
GREENSHIELD, GOLD1E 
GUTENTAG. IRENE 
HATHEWAY, LETA 
HERSH, ETHELYN 
HILTY, FANNIE 
HOFSTETTER, FRIEDA 
HOLL, EDITH 
HOOVER, PAULINE 
HOPKINS, HELEN 
HAUSLEY, ADA 
HUNTER, RUTH 
JENNINGS, EDITH 
KASNER, PAUL 
KEIDEL, HELEN 
KELLER, CORA 
KELLEY, MARIE 
KMET, MILA 
KNAPP, ALICE 
KNOLL, FRANCES 
KOCHERT, GLADYS 
KRAFT. NOLA 
KRIGER, GRACE 
KUDER, ZELDA 
LADRACH, LILLIAN 



Page Sixty-jour 



LAEKINS, MILDRED 
LOWER, ESTER 
LYNN, VIRGINIA 
LYONS, GEORGIA 
McBANE, ELEANOR 
McCANN, FLORENCE 

McClelland, genevieve 
mccullough, mildred 

McEVDREE, SYLVIA 
McGRATH, LEONA 

McMillan, arthur 

McNEILLY, LOIS 
MAAS, THERESA 
MARSDAN, KATHRYN 
MARTIN, IRIS 
MATHIAS, WALTER 
MAXWELL, VIRGINIA 
MEACHAM, MABLE 
MERCER, ALICE 
MILLER, EDITH 
MILLER, GENEVIEVE 
MOORE, SARA 
NICODEMES, ETHEL 
PLUM, DOROTHY 
PEAKE, ESTER 
PHILPOTT, IRME 
PIERCE, EVELYN 



PUGH, EDITH 
RAQUET, RUTH 
RHODES, LETA 
ROLLER, MARIE 
RUEHLING, LILLIAN 
SCHMUCKER, DELLA 
SEARS, BERTHA 
SEVEREN, INA 
SHAUGHNESSY, RUTH 
SHUART, RHODA 
SLOUGH, EDGAR 
STEWART, MARY 
STOKES, ETHEL 
STOPHER, HELEN 
STOSKOPF, HELEN 
STRATTON, BEATRICE 
TARR, IONA 
THOMAS, CECIL 
ULLMAN, LINDA 
UPTON, VIOLET 
VICKERS, GLADYS 
WEINBROER, GLADYS 
WERSTLER, VIOLET 
WHITTEMORE, MIRIAN 
WILLIAMS, LOYIS 
ZEH, OLGA 
ZIMMERLY, EDNA 



Page Sixty-five 



dlmttors 

One warm evening this spring, Mr. Van Horn, after having interviewed 
fifteen faculty members concerning a program alteration, sixty students on why 
they had not attended assembly, and answering the nonsensical whim of some 
Senior, went home tired and worn out and threw himself dowu on the porch 
swing and went to sleep. 

Pie dreamed a most peculiar and yet delightful dream. It was after com- 
mencement and all the troublesome Seniors had departed. The whole school 
was made up of one big class of Juniors, there being no Seniors, Sophomores, 
or Freshmen. The school got out of its old rut of school spirit, everything 
livened up ; every night of the week there was staged either a dance, vaudeville, 
or banquet. In two years the school became so widely known for its "pep" that 
they had to commence building extra buildings to accommodate the students 
and in five years they had built entirely around the campus. At this juncture 
Mr, Van Horn awuke, but how true was his dream! 

Did you ever stop to think how many Juniors are in the different school 
activities, and the things they promote each year? Compare the entertain- 
ments given by the other various organizations of the school with those given 
under the supervision of the Juniors. 

However, throughout the year the Junior class has been fully alive in- 
tellectually as well as socially. Juniors have found their places in the re- 
sponsible offices of the school and have acquitted themselves admirably. As 
the Juniors become the Seniors of next year there remains a spirit of good 
fellowship toward all members of the school and a memory of a year of good 
times and duties well done. 



J 



Page Sixty-six 




Page Sixty-seven 




Page Sixty-eiglit 




Page Sixty-nine 




Page Seventy 




BARRY, EUGENE 
CLARKE, HERBERT 
CUMMINS, LILLIAN 
DAVIS, LEONA 
DIETERTCH, KATHERIXE 
ELLIOTT, GEORGE 
FRANCIS, GLENN 
FREEMAN. MARX 
GOOCH. HORACE 
GRIGGY. HOWARD 
HAHN, HELEN 
HIGHBERGER. MARY 
HILL, GEORGE 
HISEY, OLLIE 
HUGE, THEODORE 
JACOBS, LEONARD 
KEIDEL. KATHRYX 
LYMAN, DORIS 



CHAPMAN. GERALD 
COOK. ADRIAL 



PINACH, FRANK 



iFrrslmunt 

McFADDEN, ROBERT 
McGOWAN, HOWARD 
McMEEX, KATHERINE 
MILLER. LOUISE 
MILLER, MAR IK 
. (WEN, ARLEEN 
TATCHIN, HAZEL 
PERKINS. LEONARD 
PRESTON, JESSIE 
RITTENHOUSK. LUCY 
ROBINSON, MAYXARD 
SCHROEDER, BENJAMIN 
SHURTZ, RUTH 
SKILTOX. EMILY 
SNIDER, ELIZABETH 
STEM. GLADYS 
SWEEXEY. WILLIAM 
TERRILL. MABEL 

SOPHOMORES 

GIFFORD. HARVEY 
PLECHATY, ELEANOR 

JUNIORS 
RIEDIXGER. LAURA 



TILTOX. MARY 
WHEELER, RAYMOND 
WiEDIE, LESTER 
WILLIAMSON, JULIUS 
WILSON, FRANCIS 
BEOHTEL, ORYA 
BONE, DONALD 
CAMPBELL, AMANDA 
DICKEY, DOROTHY 
GROSSEXBACKER. FLORA 
McCOY, CLARA 
MARSHALL. HEXRY 
MILLER, RUTH 
NIPPLE, MELVIN 
STARKEY. LESLIE 
SWARTZ. JOHN 
WARREN, LeROY 



SABIX, LEON 



WAITE, ALBERT 



Page Seventy-one 



Mntogra&s 



Who started The Kentonian 1 Who started The Chestnut Burr 1 Who 
gave the best dances ? Who furnished the athletic stars ? Where did the 
social leaders come from ? The answer to these questions is easy — THE COL- 
LEGE SECTION. 

Since we are here for four years we have a better opportunity to become 
imbued with the real college spirit. Our ambition is to make every student at 
Kent State a member of the four year course, a booster of Kent State, and 
disciple of the Kent State spirit. We hope to incarnate in every student a supreme 
love for his alma mater, and the desire to give her the best he has in the effort 
to increase her greatness. 

We hope to make our motto for the guidance of the future years : 

"Tho' much is taken, much abides and tho' 

We are not now; that strength which in old days 

Moved earth and heaven ; that which we are, we are, 

One equal temper of heoric hearts. 

Make weak by time and fate, but strong in will 

To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield." 



Page Seventy-i<wo 



®ljF Alumni 



"A builder went forth to build." 
The foregoing statement might be applicable to thousands of situations. 
Whether the proposed building be a skyscraper in one of our large cities, or 
a miserable hut along the Amazon or in darkest Africa, one element is always 
necessary — material. 

The fundamental difference existing between the skyscraper of New York 
City and the hut on the Amazon are few. There is a difference in plans, size, 
materials and construction. 

An architect may draw plans for something very simple or for something 
very elaborate; it may be large or small. Be it as it may, the effectiveness 
of the structure depends largely on the material and how this material is 
arranged. 

A monument pointing out and directing the lives of untold millions is in 
process of construction. The material is being turned out of the great factory 
on the hill at Kent. The material is the Alumni Body of the Kent State Normal 
College. 

How gigantic, beautiful, and inspiring this monument really becomes, 
depends entirely upon the material and its position in the structure. If im- 
proper material is turned out, or good material is not used in the logical place, 
the value of the monument to the world will be sacrificed to that extent. 

Already the monument has commenced to attract attention almost world 
wide and to cast an influence over the lives of many boys and girls. This early 
attention is not due to the magnetic qualities of the monument so much as to 
the efficiency of the factory and to the officers and workmen in charge thereof. 

The monument itself, however, should begin to wield a powerful influence 
over all that comes within view of it. It is, therefore, necessary to keep each 
of these blocks polished and in good repair at all times. 

Another section of this monument is to be completed in June, while other 
additions will be made in July and August. We, the members of the Alumni, 
who constit\;te the foundation of this wonderful monument, extend a most 
hearty welcome to all who later become a part of and magnify the value of 
our structure. 

We trust that all new-comers will lie better than any who have preceded 
them, and that each will find himself located in that place for which he was 
intended, so that harmony, beauty and inspirations of the structure may always 
be at its best. 



Page Seventy-three 



®lje BtnU Human's ICeartup 

When a woman enters Kent State College, she becomes, automatically, a 
member of the Woman's League. 

The League does some things for which it will be remembered, such as 
planting trees on the campus. Possibly, some will remember the first day they 
came to Kent and remember the guides who met them. Others may have a 
tender place in their hearts for a big sister who helped them get acquainted. 
These are some of the things of which the League takes charge. Oh, yes, they 
did put on assembly programs and a show and some parties, too. 

The executive board, which worries about the business affairs, is composed 
of: Lucille Sharp, President; Marie Young, Vice-President; Aim Lewis. Sec- 
retary; Eloise Chamberlain, Treasurer; and representatives of different organi- 
zations in the college who are as follows : Edna Johnson, Elizabeth Jones, 
Audrey Warren, Kathryn Chapman, Alice Beane, Mildred Snyder, Mary Bissell, 
Marie Kulow, Florence Critz, Crilla Belle Thomas, Doris Halliwell. and Eliza- 
beth Corbett. 



Page S evenly- fou* 




Kappa Mu Kappa 

POUNDED AT KENT STATE COLLEGE IX 1922 
ALPHA CHAPTER 
(Established in 1922) 

OFFICERS 

Everlin Dille President 

Willard C. Bryan Vice-President 

Harvey Crow Secretary 

Elbert Tischendorf Treasurer 

Pasqual Carlozzi blaster of Works 

Henry Robson Prelate 

David Beckwith • S. at A. 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
Paul Spangler Elbert Tischendorf Henry Robson 

CLASS OF 1924 
Willard C. Bryan, Limaville, 0. Paul Spangler. Wooster, 0. 

Henry Robson, Coshocton, <>. Arthur Swartz, Cleveland, <). 

Elbert Tischendorf, Lincoln City. Indiana. 

CLASS OF 1925 
Gail Sheets, Jefferson, 0. Everlin Dille. Cleveland, 0. 

David Beckwith, Kent, 0. Pasqual Carlozzi. Cleveland. 0. 

Leon Sabin, Randolph. 0. Gerald Chapman, Kent. 0. 

Harvev Crow. Beach City (). Ward Overholt, Kent, 0. 

Fred Zappolo, Macedonia, 0. Howard Evans, Canal Fulton. (). 

CLASS OF 1926 
John Swartz, Canton, 0. Theodore Huge, Cleveland, 0. 

Marion Wolcott. Kent, 0. Benjamin Schroeder, Cleveland, O. 

John Schiely, Cleveland. 0. Glenn Francis, Martinsburg. 0. 

George McFarlin, Cadiz, 0. Kenneth Cook. Kent. 0. 



Page Seventy-five 




I . w. or. a. 

Cabinet 

President Margaret Stewart 

Vice-President Thelma Hyland 

Secretary Lucille Sharp' 

Treasurer Florence Critz 

Membership Mary Bissell 

Public ity Isobel Chandler 

Flower Marie Young: 

Program Vinnietta Warner 

Social Clarissa Flowers 

Undergraduate Representative Alice Beane 

Pianist Mary Bissell 

Song Leader Kathrvn Chapman 

Adviser Miss Bess Rider 



Page Seventy-six 





\ 


feX 



Septemher 23rd, 1923 marks an interesting event in tin' history of the 
Y. W. C. A. On that day. a large group of girls, carrying lunch boxes, hiked 
to Twin Lakes. We ate our lunch picnic fashion under a tree, munching apples, 
plentifully furnished by a nearby orchard. For our dessert, we held the first 
business meeting of the year. Miss Lota Evans, president, presided. A happy 
surprise followed the business meeting. We went boat riding. 

An improvement over previous meetings was made by changing the meeting 
night from Sunday to Wednesday night. The mid-week services are looked 
forward to with interest. The meetings this year have been unusually good, 
and also well attended. Some of our speakers have been Mr. Rumohl. Mr. 
Packard, and Dean Verder. as well as a number of the students and our V. W. 
advisor. Miss Bess Rider. 

Our President, Miss Lota Evans, and our Vice-President, Evelyn Tompkins, 
left school at the close of the first term. Miss Margaret Stewart and Miss 
Thelma Hyland were then elected to these offices. 

At the Penn State game, the Y. W. girls served sandwiches to the hungry 
spectators. Associated in our minds we hear, Rah. Rah, Kent! Hot Dogs, right 
this way ! Touchdown! Rah! 

The V. W. ('. A. girls and a few of the boys from the Men's club assisted 
Mr. Eversoll in raising the money for the Student Friendship Fund, which 
amounted to more than .+266. 

The Y. W. C. A. Bazaar was a great success and the Colonial Party, usually 
held the first Saturday after Washington's birthday, was held April seventh, on 
account of an unexpected vacation. 

Miss Verder, our new Dean of Women, has helped the organization and 
has its interest at heart. 



Paur Seventy-seven 




&l\? Hit? m\b (&aib lebatttuj (Uluh 

OFFICERS 

(Fall and Winter Terms) 

Ward H. Overho't President 

Williard C. Bryan Vice President 

John Harvey Crow Secretary 

Burgett Everett Yeo Ass't. Secretary 

John H. Brown Treasurer 

Professor E. E. Mauchesl< Faculty Adviser 

Membership Committee: Burgett E. Yeo and Fred Zappolo. 
Question Committee: Willard C. Bryan and John H. Crow. 

(Spring Term) 

Ward H. Overholt President 

Elbert W. Teschendorf Vice President 

John Harvey Crov. Secretary 

Oscar Ray Le Beau Ass't. Secretary 

John H. Brown Treasurer 

Burgett Everett Yeo Sergeant-at-Arms 



Page Seventy-eiqht 



ROLL 

l See picture. Front Row, Left to Right) 

David Reckwith Portage County 

Elbert Teschendorf Spencer County, Ind. 

John Harvey Crow Tuscarawas County 

Ward H. Overholt Portage County 

Willard C. Bryan Stark County 

Gerald. Chapman Portage County 

George P. McFarland Harrison County 

(Back Row, Left to Right) 

Alfred W. Couch Portage County 

James R, Beck Knox County 

William C. Reed Mahoning County 

Burgett Everett Yeo Portage County 

Wayne M. Heaston Harrison County 

John H. Brown Coshocton County 

Fred Zappolo Summit County 

(Not in Picture) 

Oscar Ray Le Beau Stark County 

Frank L. Hogue Ashtabula County 

Roland Dean Marshall Stark County 

The Blue and Gold Debating' Club is proud of the fact that it is the 
oldest organization at Kent State, having been organized in October, 1921. 
It is one of several organizations sponsored by Mr. Manchester, who. throughout 
the past two years lias been the faculty adviser. To him, the Club pays tribute 
for its beginning. 

The meetings throughout the year were characterized by enthusiasm, good 
will, and good natured rivalry. Formal debates were always the order of the 
day, but the monotony was relieved by parliamentary drill and impromptu 
speaking and debating. 

Late in the season, an attempt was made to schedule a debate with Akron 
University, but we were not able to complete our negotiations. Both teams. 
however, look forward to the time when they shall meet next year. 

Through the interest and ability shown this year, the Club hopes to be 
made a part of the English Department with a coach to help us put Kent State 
on the map. 



Page Seventy-nine 




(% (BnlUg* 01i|ofr 



The College Choir at Kent State was organized early in the fall term. It 
is the only vocal musical organization in the College. It is composed of some 
twenty or twenty-five students, mostly from the College and Senior sections. 
The Choir has already given a short program at one of the chapel periods, 
and will probably present another in the near future. The members have 
practiced faithfully every Thursday evening after school, and will feel well 
repaid for the time and effort it has cost them, when they look back on the 
pleasant hours spent together in 13-S and think of the joy and inspiration they 
have derived from the singing of the finer grade of music which we have been 
using. 

Hiss Shamel deserves a very great amount of praise for the way in which 
she lias built up the organization and guided it so efficiently. 

The students who have been in the organization have manifested great 
interest in the work, and only wish that there were many more to join them. 

Those who have attended rehearsals most regularly are: 



Lucile Sharpe 
Anne Saddler 
Miss Hess 
Eleanor Ford 
Miss Beane 
W. G. Hopper 
J. H. Brown 



Grace Trover 
Miss Pitkin 
Esther Fudge 
Miss Boomer 
Florence Critz 
Carlan Elliott 
Edith Esehliman 



Elizabeth Jones 
Clarissa Flowers 
Lucile Esehliman 
Albert Tischendorf 
Wayne Heaston 
Edgar Slough 



Page Eighty 



dlmttnr GUjDrus 

One of the strong organizations of the past year lias been the Junior 
Chorus which includes anyone who is taking the Music II course. The four 
divisions of the Music II group arc here united and the various members raise 
their voices in song. 

During the fall term, the Chorus met on Mondays and Wednesdays at 
eleven o'clock, hut during the winter the hour was given to another class. 
Now, in the spring term, the group is again in action, and shows great promise. 

During the fall term, the Chorus gave several numbers at Assembly, some 
of them being "On, On, On Thou Soul." a group of negro spirituals and a 
group of Italian folk songs. 

For the spring term, Miss Shamel, the director, is planning an evening 
musieale to include chorus singing by the one hundred and eighty voices, solos 
and numbers by a very fine harpist. 

It is hoped that the evening will be a great success, and will put a feather 
in the cap of the Junior Chorus. 

(Ihr (Unllnjr GDrrljeatra 

Organized in the fall term, our orchestra has proven a source of interest 
to its members ami of pleasure to the whole College. The orchestra is com- 
posed of members of the student body, aided by members of the High School 
who have, with a great deal of faithful practice, succeeded in producing a really 
worth while musical organization. 

With violins, piano, saxophone, cornet and traps, the orchestra is ready with 
jazz for the college dances or when called upon to render classical music for 
chapel. Under Miss Shamel's direction, the orchestra has grown to he a real 
college organization which is appreciated by faculty and students alike, and we 
think all the members deserve a great deal of credit for their good work. 



Page Eighty-one 



20£ 



TC 



The Kentonian 




Page Eig/ity-t<wo 




Ollir Kmt (Eollrrt? Press 

BUILDING TRADITION 

"Tlu glory of the present is to make the future free. 
We tore our school for what it is, and what it is to be." 

"Now is the time for every Kent Stater to stop and reflect a moment. 
Short time ago, where now stands these stately buildings, there was but a wooded 
ridge. It has only been a few years since the demand for a State School in 
Northeastern Ohio received any attention. Men of ideals and action brought 
that State School to Kent. It rests with the student body to sustain the judg- 
men of these men. 

Ours is a new school. Situated in a locality that has always educated 
through the private college, Kent State has had to face opposition. Thus far 
we have met this opposition squarely and the record of our' enrollment is the 
result. We are proud of the splendid growth of our college; but growth in 
numbers is not everything; there must be a corresponding growth in ideals and 
school spirit. 

We as students of today are laying the foundation for the future Kent 
State. The seeds that we plant today are bound to grow. It is our duty to 
carefully investigate the kind of seeds we are planting. The glory of Kent 
State in 1953 is directly dependent upon the glory of Kent State in 1923. 

Ours is the sacred task of BUILDING TPtADITION ! Let us face it with 
a resolute heart." — (Editorial from Kent College Press, February 10th, '23) 



Page Eighty-three 






Mortal ^rtPttr? Club 







The Social Science Club, which was organized during the winter quarter. 
started out with a charter membership of sixteen. Its personnel is drawn largely 
from the Department of History and Social Science, although the membership 
is not narrowly restricted, the club being only quasi-departmental in character. 
It is organized 1'or the benefit of all students of the college who have a serious 
interest in the vital social problems of the day. In addition to stimulating 
interest in the important contemporary problems the Club purposes to give 
valuable social training through active participation in the work of the organ- 
ization. As the Club grows, it is planned to bring before it outside talent from 
time to time to discuss current topics of especial interest. 

The meetings held this year have been attended by an interested group who 
have enjoyed the very successful programs rendered. 

OFFICERS 

Will G. Hopper President 

John .J. Schiely Secretary Treasurer 

Program Committee 
Prof. H. D. Byrne ill'. Frank Moore 

Asst. Prof. Eleanor Ann Meyer Mr. Adrial V. Cook 

Miss Lauramarie Wegman 

MEMBERSHIP 
George Hoffee 
John J. Schiely 
Lauramarie Wegeman 
Willard C. Brvan 
II. D. Byrne 
Laura Riedinger 
Mildred C. Cook 



Kthel Carroll 
Frank L. Ilogue 
Crilla Belle Thomas 
Will G. Hopper 
Paul Packard 
Adrial V. Cook 
Pasqual Carlozzi 



Frank R. Moore 
Eleanor A. Meyer 
Charles F. Koehler 
II. G. Robson 
Oscar LeBeau 
James Beck 



Page Eighty-jour 



(Eumnt iEupttta (Elub 




Oil the afternoon of February 9th, 1923, there was organized the Current 
Events Club, an organization that is destined to take a permanent place among 
Kent State activities. The primary purpose of the Society is to supplement 
The Blue and Gold Debating Club, and to keep posted on the details of all 
events of importance. 

The organization is founded purely as a means of transmitting information, 
and it .shall be the permanent policy of the Club, to prohibit the discussion 
of any religious or political subject in a partisan manner. 

The following men attended the opening meeting and hence became charter 
members of the Club: Frank Moore, Frank L. Hogue, J. H. ('row. Oscar Le 
Beau, Paul Packard, Elbert Tischendorf, David Beckwith, and Burgett Everett 
Yeo. 

The membership is restricted to the men of the college who can show evi- 
dence that they are actually interested in such an undertaking. 

OFFICERS 

FRANK RICHARD MOORE President 

DAVID BECKWITH Vice-President 

FRANK L. HOGUE Secretary 

OSCAR LE BEAU Treasurer 

ELBERT TISCHENDORF Sergeant-at-arms 

PAUL PACKARD— BURGETT YEO Program Committee 

J. H. CROW— BURGETT YEO Membership Committee 



Page Eiglity-jive 



ffitt (Blub 




Miss Hazel Hewitt described the plans of the Lit Club far better than 
anyone else could, when she presented the Club to the assembly on Club Day. In 
her appeal, she asked the students to venture into fairyland on her magic 
carpet and as they went along to collect the different things that appealed to 
them, and find others of the same tastes and join together to form little clubs 
on different phases of literature. "Wish and it's yours: let's make use of our 
magic carpets," was her closing plea. 

To fulfill the demands of the student body, the Lit Club divided itself into 
three sections: Drama, Fiction and Poetry. This arrangement has proven 
particularly valuable at Kent State, as it possesses the most advantageous fea- 
tures of both large and small clubs. Intensive group work was carried on in all of 
these branches and monthly united meetings were held. At these joint meetings, 
one section entertained with the results of that month's study. The Lit Club is 
a successful innovation at Kent State, and it is putting literature in a position 
to race for first place. 

The Dramatic Section, in a general way, has been the most active of the 
three sections. It entertained the student body with several smart dramas. 



Page Eighty-six 



The play presented by this organization for the Skirt Show was the outstanding 
feature of the program. Once more, the fact that interest plus a little practice 
accomplishes a great deal was demonstrated. 

The Fiction Section devotes itself to the fiction of the very best American 
authors. When this supply is exhausted, selections will he studied from 
recognized writers of foreign countries. Though but six months old, and com- 
paritively small for its age, it has occupied a distinct place in the extra- cur- 
riculum work. Who will ever forget the Thursday Special? Since it was none 
other than the Fiction Club that made it possible for others to hear Professor 
Packard's "Joa7i d' Arc." After that entertainment, every one agreed that the 
"F. 0. " did start something. A committee is preparing a book list for the 
members of the Club which undoubtedly will prove a valuable aid in the choice 
of future reading. It is the sincere wish of this club that it shall ever continue 
to be one of the best clubs in K. S. X. C. 

The purpose of the Modern Poetry Section is for each of the members to 
read modern poetry both for study and enjoyment. Each member brings to 
the meeting the poems he has read during the week that he especially wished 
the other members to know. These poems are read, discussed and collected in 
a note book. Thus the collection is not only that of individual contribution, but 
a composite gathering of the entire group. The members are very proud of their 
note books, and are sure that they hold some rare gems that will be useful in 
the future. 

GENERAL OFFICERS 

President Jean Hartenstein 

Vice-President Willard C. Bryan 

Secretary ' Mary Bissell 

Dramatic Section 

President Mildred Snyder 

Vice-President Frances Melamed 

Secretary Jean Hai'tenstein 

Treasurer Mary Bissell 

Modern Fiction Section 

President Susie Bleadingheiser 

Vice-President Kathryn Keidel 

Secretary and Treasurer Lucien Black 

Faculty Advisers Misses Isabelle Dunbar and Isabelle Hazen 



Page Eighty-seven 



(Hit? Unbaov (§utn GUitb 



"The Indoor Outer Club started on its first outdoor hike on Monday 
evening. Mr. R. E. Manchester led the crowd of about forty boys and girls. 
About two inches of snow was on the ground and every one was dressed for the 
weather. The crowd traveled through the woods, up hill and down dale, and 
through briar patches and swamps. Many signs of small animals were noticed 
by different members of the crowd and one rabbit was chased out to arouse 
the interest of the crowd to a height. The crowd returned with heavy feet 
but lighter bodies and all are eagerly looking forward to the next hike."' — Kent 
College Press. 

The above clipping describes only one of a series of spontaneous hikes that 
were directed by the Indoor Cuter Club. Spontaneous — because the time, place 
and number of the Outers were usually determined by the immediate wishes of 
the assembled crowd. 

The Club was proposed by Dean Yerder's Reading 20 class on Club Day. 
The name, with the permission of Mr. Manchester, was taken from the title of 
one of his hooks, and this book became the constitution and guide of the Club. 
Mr. Manchester, the most enthusiastic of all Kent Staters, explained the plan 
of the Club in an amusing speech in chapel. This speech launched the Club so 
tar out into the deep, that it had no alternative — it must sail on. Miss Oowans 
and Mr. Manchester were chosen as sponsors of the Clubi 

Neglecting slightly the preface to its name, the Outers have been most 
active. Their usual plan of action was : Monday — drop two bits into the box. 
Wednesday — hike to a nearby lake, then eat, play timers for awhile, and 
hike-it home. 

In this Club. Mr. Manchester has been the nucleus around which have 
clustered the most ambitious of the college students. (As we started so shall 

we end ). 

"Left — Left — Left — The girls are hiking. Look out. squirrels, they will 
come. This was the spirit in which the co-eds of Kent State College started out 
on their hike. Part of the group made a snappy tramp to Lake Brady enjoying 
the beauty of the Lake and its surroundings, and then appeased their appetites. 
25 girls with 25 large picnic lunches under their arms, marching down the Cleve- 
land Youngstown road made quite a spectacle. The rest of the hikers over- 
estimated their newly acquired ability and decided to go to Lake Stafford. To 
Lake Stafford they did go, but it is rumored they returned on four wheels. 
Hiking has become one of the new college sports. Be on the watch; these co-ed 
hikers of Kent State may visit you some day." — Kent College Press. 



Page Eighty-rig lit 




(Uir Borne truummrs (Club 

The Home Economics Club is an organization of girls, interested in the 
home and its problems. The Club aims to make better home-makers and conse- 
quently establish more ideal homes in our communities. Besides this real and 
lasting benefit, the girls have made their friendships stronger through this 
organization. There is something compelling and binding about this group, 
linked together by common purposes. 

In its educational and social aspects, the Club has carried on old traditions 
and also established some new customs. Early in the year, a business meeting 
was held and officers elected. The regular meeting night was the second and 
fourth Thursday of each month. Lectures and discussions were interesting and 
profitable. The Club, this year, followed its customs of having breakfast in the 
grove back of the College. On a fine May morning, when the dew was still on 
the buttercups, the girls scampered out to the woods. Such dainties as were 
taken from the horn of plenty! Ham and eggs never before tasted so delicious. 
Then there was the dinner in the department dining room in Science Hall. 
The Food Class served cakes and fruit ice. All together the Club has had a 
most happy year. 



Page Eicj!ity-nin 







MOULTON HALL 




LOWRY HALL 



Page Ninety 




u;hr Wtt Campus (Stria 

SONG 

(Tune: Marching Through Georgia.) 
We < ). C. Girls are jolly girls 
As you have often seen ; 
As jolly as the maids of old, 
Who danced "The Village Oiven." 
We know Kent State is proud of us, 
And well we know our Dean 
Will hurrah for the "Off Campus Girls." 



Chorus 



e Off Campus Girls, 
a jolly bunch of girls, 

with song'. 



Hurrah ! Hurrah ! For tl: 

Hurrah! Hurrah! We're 

Courageous, true and loyal 

While our hearts are tilled 

Then, hurrah for the Off Campus Girls. 

The 0. C. Girls are gay young girls. 

At heart, if not in years: 

And as to minding P's and Q "s, 

We challenge all our peers. 

We cross the paths, the campus dot. 

The woods ring with our cheers, 

Then, hurrah for the Off Campus Girls. 

Tis due the 0. G. K. S. Girls 

A tiny bit of praise. 

They help to boost with pep and song. 

And Kent State's banners raise. 

All know full well the charm they lend. 

That brightens college days. 

Then, hurrah for the Off Campus Girls. 

Mrs. Laura M. Riedinger 



Page Ninety-one 




* A SUPPORT W4S NfCfsS-lST" t ~^ , ^ tl WE Kg SC AR Ce" 



/V(7f Ninety-two 




Page Ninety-three 




Page Ninety-jour 



iFnntball 



When the leaves begin to turn, and the winds blow cold, it indicates the coming 
of the best of all athletics — Football. 

The season started at Kent State with twenty-four aspiring gridders 
answering the call. Paul SpangTer. last year's star, was elected captain. With 
only three of last year's letter men returning. Coach Chandler faced a tremen- 
dous task in moulding some kind of a machine together for the first game. 

The season opened on September 23rd when Kent State was defeated by 
Hiram College, 14 to 0. It was a well-played, clean game, the first half ending 
to 0. In the final period, the Hiram backfield broke through for long and 
repeated gains that netted them two touchdowns. 

On September 30th, Kent State was defeated by the Mount Union College 
eleven at Alliance. 32 to 0. The Mountaineers scored in each period, doubling 
up in the final period with two. The Blue and Gold had the ball on Mount's 
one foot line, but a costly fumble lost the ball. 

After meeting defeat at the hands of Mount Union, Kent State warriors 
travelled to Cleveland, October 7th. only to have St. Ignatius grab off a 34 
to victory. The Saints presented an attack that was too much for Chandler's 
much lighter team. 

On October 14th, the Blue and Gold went to Ashland and displayed the 
most spirited fight of the season. Ryan and Isaacson smashed at Ashland's 
defense while Herrick and Swartz starred on Kent State's defense. The game 
was hard fought throughout and resulted in a 14 to victory for Ashland. 

After meeting defeat at every turn and with only a handful of men. Kent 
faced Baldwin- Wallace at Berea on October 21st. This was our most crippling 
game of the season. Robson was injured and had to be taken to the hospital. 
Several line men had to be jerked on account of injuries. Everybody brought 
home some kind of a bruise. The B. W. Boys were glad to get 32 points to our if 

With the effects of the Berea game hardly over, on November 4th. Penn 
State Normal came to Kent to wrest a 14 to victory from the Blue and Gold. 
Penn made their scores in the first and second periods. In the last of the first 
half, Kent had the ball on Penn's eight yard line, but Dietz tried in vain to buck 
it over. This score for us would have told a different story. Both Isaacson 
and Swartz showed well in this game. 

Last on the program came Bowling Green and on Armistice Day the two 
rival normal colleges clashed. The result was a 6 to defeat for Kent. The 
teams were evenly matched and the play was fast and furious, Ryan, Swartz, 
Dietz and Spangler showing best for the locals. 

The season ended as everything good or bad must, but our memory will 
ever cherish the valor of these men who gave their all as a sacred duty to their 
alma mater. Win. lose, or draw, they are loyal sons of Kent State College. 



Page Ninety-five 




laakft Sail 

When the pig-skin has been tucked away, and the snow begins to fly. comes 
the greatest of all indoor sports — basketball. 

About eighteen ambitions basketballers answered Coach ('handler's initial 
call, only two of which, Hardy and Evans, were letter men of last year. All 
practice sessions and home games were held in the Congregational Gymnasium. 

The opening game was played at Ashland where Kent State was defeated 
24 — 18. In the first half, Ashland ran away from the locals, but during the 
latter period, the Blue and Gold showed some pretty team-work and tightened 
the score. 

Tlie next game with Dayton was a 26 to 11 defeat for Kent, the Downstaters 
presenting a much superior offense. One week later Baldwin-Wallace handed 



Page Ninety-six 



Chandler's crew a 32 to 15 beating. The Berea Boys showed nothing startling in 
team-work but were very fortunate in their long shots. 

After losing three straight games, Kent State finally struck its stride and 
scalped the Cleveland Spencerians by a 22 to 18 score. In this game, State 
showed plenty of the fast floor work and caging ability. 

Showing the same smooth team play the Blue and Cold next completely 
outclassed the Davey Institute, 23 to 13. This victory was, indeed, a most 
satisfying one. 

Over confidence broke Kent State's winning streak at Cleveland the next 
week. 

Kent struck a- snag in the trip to Hiram and was completely snowed under, 
48 to 10. The "Christians" displayed a brilliant floor attack which entirely 
bewildered the Staters. 

The next game resulted in another victory over the Davey Tree "Skin- 
ners," the score this time being 30 to 20. 

Akron University, second team in the Ohio Conference, journeyed to Kent 
and administered a 48 to 25 lacing to the locals. Despite the final result of the 
game, Kent State probably showed her best ability during this combat. 

After losing six and winning three. State wound up the season by swamp- 
ing the John Marshall Law School of Cleveland. 35 to 12. 

The basketball season did not break any records or present any long string 
of victories. It did, however, develop a team that was full of fight and able to 
come back after defeat. 

Theodore Huge, center, was the main cog on the offense and a tower of 
strength on the defense. Evans, Frances, Hardy, and Miller, for forwards, did 
their share in every game; while Carlozzi, Shroeder and Gooeh, guards, all 
played consistent basket ball. 

SUMMARY OF GAMES PLAYED 

Kent State 18 Ashland 24 

Kent State 11 Dayton 26 

Kent State 15 Baldwin-Wallace 32 

Kent State 22 Cleve. Spencerians 18 

Kent State 23 Davey Institute 13 

Kent State 17 Cleve. Spencerians 21 

Kent State 10 Hiram 48 

Kent State 30 Davey Institute 20 

Kent State 25 Akron U 48 

Kent State 35 John Marshall 12 



Paqe Ninety-seven 







®rark 








The spring days 


of '22 on Kent State's Athle 


tic 


Field found 


students of 


all varieties, 


young, 


old, small, and large training 


off 


the winter's 


indulgence 


by slamming 


the shot 


put, clearing the hurdles, throwing the discus 


kicking up 


cinders on tli 


e track, 


jumping, vaulting and runnin 


g; 


everything to 


whip in to 


shape for the 


annual 


"Speed Carnival ". 








( Jakes ai 


d pies 


were marked off of the menu. 


two dates a w 


?ek was the 


limit, cigaret 


es were 


thrown away, and earlv hours 


were kept by — 


some. Well, 


anyway, on t 


certain day, local athletes met with 


jlood in their eyes. It was 


the survival of the fittest, each man for himself. F 


ive 


points were 


given for a 


first, three points for 


a second, and one point for a 


thii 


d. 




Pinach took hig 


l honors by copping off three 


firsts, one second, and one 


third, totalli] 


g nineteen points. Dietz ran second w 


ith 


a total of sixteen points. 


while Hardy 


was a c 


lose third with fifteen points. 

RECORDS 

10(1 Yard Dash (lD/i sec 


) 






1 — Pinach 




2 — lluxom 
High Jump (5 ft. 1 in. 


3- 

) 


-Dietz 




1 — Dietz 




2— Cole 

Mile Run (5 min. 18 sec. 


3- 

) 


-Elker 




1— Hardy 




2— Folger 
Pole Valt (8 ft. 6 in.) 


3- 


—Schneider 




1— Pinach 




2 — Fillmore 

Half Mile (2 min. 18 sec 


3- 

) 


-Dietz 




1— Hardy 




2 — Schneider 
Shot Put (37 ft. 4y 2 in.) 


3- 


-Fox 




1— Dietz 




2— Pinach 
220 Yard Hurdles (80 sec 


3- 

.) 


-Knight 




1— Elker 




2— Sheets 

440 Yard Dash (58y 4 sec 


3- 

) 


-Dietz 




1— Hardy 




2— Cole 


3- 


-Schneider 








Running Broad Jump (17 ft. 


6 in.) 




1— Pinach 




2— Dietz 
Javelin (105 ft. 6 in.) 


'^~ 


-Elker 




1 — Lnxom 




2— Miller 


3- 


-Jones 





Page Ninely-eig/it 




iasrball '22 



''Kent State slaughter Akron University 
""Kent State Wallops Spencerian, 17-2" 
"Kent State Trims Hiram, 4-3" 



15-5 ' " 



These are the headlines which for once in the history of Kent State ap- 
peared in newspapers. Why shouldn't such a successful season occur when 
Cook, Scheitz, Hostettler, Elker, Swigart, and Fillmore were always on the 
diamond. Xot only were these stars always in action hut Hoffee. Kirk. Rogers. 
Dietz, and Weinman were experts at the hat. The pitching was responsible for 
the victories. Swigart had a corking curve hall ami baffling change of pace 
while Fillmore displayed big league form in the latter part of the season. 
Hostettler as captain and Evans as manager piloted the team to a successful 
season. 

Besides these Inter-Collegiate contests, all the student body enjoyed in- 
tra-mural game between the "Spring Beauties" and the "Hibernators." Be- 
fore the first ball was thrown a skunk cabbage parade was staged under the 
leadership of Carnahan, "Hot-Rock", and Moore for the benefit of the "Spring- 
Beauties." 

Despite the fact that the Appropriations limit the amount of supplies that 
are purchased for the base ball team, Coach Chandler is to be commended for 
the able manner in which he has secured results. The base ball teams at Kent 
State are very largely dependent upon the heavy influx of students May 1st. 
This arrangement does not allow the coach any time to whip a team together. 
Never-the-less he has inculcated into his warriors the fighting spirit and the 
victories have come as a result. 



Page Ninrty-ninc 




BLUE CHAMPIONS 




Page One Hundred 



(girls' laate lall 



There is an old adage that says "anticipation is half of the realization". 
Perhaps this applies to girl's haskethall at Kent State. During the season, twice 
a week, through the closed gym door came the sound of a haskethall whistle. 
After an hour of strenuous work on the floor, the girls would appear with 
rumpled hair and perspiring eyes, but the look and laughter in their eyes 
showed that there is fun as well as rivalry in basketball. All this time the 
student body was going through what we call anticipation. 

The realization came with the announcement that the Blue team would 
play the Gold in the first game of the series. The teams were chosen by lot. 
Some thought it was a distinction to wear a gold head band. Others, of course, 
though like-wise of the blue. From the first sound of Referee Hardy's whistle 
the game was one of interest as well as speed. After a few minutes of play 
the Golds dropped in two field goals, keeping the lead all through the game. 
In the second half the Blues made three baskets, leaving the final score 10-6. 

in the next game played the following week, the Blues decided that t hex- 
wanted to play a third game. To make this necessary they defeated the Golds 
with a score of 6-4. The third and deciding game of the series was beyond 
every one's anticipation. Suspense, interest, and confidence were evident 
every where. It was a battle from start to finish. Although not as fast as tin- 
first game, it was more furiously fought. The Golds in the first half threatened 
1o carry off the honors but during the last half they turned the tables by caging 
two baskets. This gave the Blues the long end of the score. 4-2. 

Both teams are to be congratulated on the splendid spirit and good-natured 
rivalry displayed. Mr. Hardy was an ideal referee and the playing showed that 
Miss Hyde's coaching had been patient and thorough. The line-up is as fol- 
lows : 



BLUES 

Glenna Van Hyning 
Saima Sopanen 
Marian Johnson 
Marie Young 
Gladys Sponsel lei- 
Marie Miller 
Magdalene Simon 
Lillian Xuendorf 
Zenith Lawrence 



GOLDS 



Ei-ma Marinelli 
Marie Kulow 
Dorothy Pemo 
Virginia Bigler 
Vennietta Warner 
Velma McCurdy 
Marial James 
Frances Ort 
Eloise Chamberlain 



Page One Hundred-one 




Page One Hundred-two 




(Ehwr IGrafcers 



heer [Leaders 

* lie 




The Spirit of '23 




KENT STATE! 

Winning Rather 
Than Losing, 
But Winning 
Or Losing 

KENT STATE! % J x 

f <v n\> v 



Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Kent State! Kent State! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Kent State! Kent State! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Kent State! Kent State! 
Yea 



YELLS 

Yea-a-a-a-a-a — TEAM ! 
Vea-a-a-a-a-a — TEAM ! 
Yea-a-a-a-a-a — TEAM ! 

Fight 'Em Fight 'Em Fight 'Em 



Page One Hundred-three 





Popularity (Uontest 



The Most Popular Man at Kent State EDGAR SLOUGH 

The Most Popular Girl at Kent State ROSETTA O'CONNOR 



Most colleges boast about having had a beauty contest, the winner of which 
becomes the idol of the college. Kent State agrees that beauty should get its 
deserved tribute. As a matter of fact, is there anyone who can refrain from ad- 
miring beauty? Although a worn-out adage, truly, external beauty is only 
skin deep. At least this was the conception of the Kent College Press, so it 
decided to start a popularity contest. The idea was that the number of friends 
cue is able to cultivate is a real test of true greatness. Every student entered 
the contest with zest and enthusiasm and cast his vote for his favorites. After 
the nominations, all waited impatiently to find out the results. Like all big elec- 
tions, the voters cast their ballot in such a way that the nominees who stood 
highest were swamped in the finals. In this way the interest was raised to the 
nth degree. Miss Rosetta O'Connor made a grand sweep of the votes and is 
now known as Kent State's Most Popular Young Lady. Congenial, witty, good- 
natured, and helpful, every new acquaintance becomes her cherished friend. 
At the piano Rosie is a perfect wizard and she has so unselfishly worked for the 
benefit of her college, that all Kent Staters have been able to enjoy and appre- 
ciate her talent. Mr. Edgar Slough defeated Mr. Paul Spangler. who ran a 
close second, thus winning the distinction of the Most Popular Man in the col- 
lege. Mr. Slough is one of that type who have developed such a harmonious 
and intricate assortment of qualities that every one is forced to like him. ll is 
impossible to describe just what the something is that he possesses. Perhaps it 
is personal charm or maybe it is just because lie is he. 



Page One Hundred-four 



Brjli ffiujljts of \$22-23 



The United States Bureau of Education honored our college by placing it 
first in a list of two hundred normal schools and teacher's colleges in the United 
States. Then Nicholas Murray Butler, President of Columbia University, in- 
vited President McGilvrey to serve on a committee composed of the heads of 
eight leading teacher's colleges iii the United States. 

Miss May H. Prentice wrote in competition with a national field for the 
$1,000 prize offered by the F. E. Compton Co., of Chicago, for the best state 
ment of the educational value of the Compton Picture Encyclopedia. She 
toured Scotland. England, Belgium. Holland. Germany, Switzerland and 
France on the $1,000 check. 

A new agriculture book has been written by Mr. Ivins and Mr. A. E. Win- 
ship. This book opens up a new field in Agriculture. 

Two new books written by Mr. Manchester, "■John Citizen and His School" 
and "The First Snowman" are to appear in print soon. 

Mona Fletcher. '21, won distinction at the University of Chicago for high 
scholastic standing. 

Vale recognized J. II. ('row's degree of Bachelor of Science in Education 
from Kent State. 

Paul Spangler won the Amateur Light-Heavy- Weight Championship of 
Ohio in the State Boxing Tournament held at Akron. As a trophy, the judges 
awarded him a watch. This versatile young man is an artist in cartooning, a 
star athlete, leading man on the stage, and preparing to be a manual training 
teacher. 

"We ha v 'nt stopped talking about the trip Kent State took to Washington 
last July. To see Washington and Arlington and Mount Vernon at a Fourth 
of July Celebration, to make real credits in geography and in history, to have 
the social enjoyment possible only when so many are making the trip, and to 
have all of these things at a cost less than would ordinarily be charged for any- 
one of them alone, is something which is hard to stop talking about. But what 
the Kentonian wants to say is that a trip has been arranged for next year that 
is to surpass last year's trip in every particular. 

Not Washington alone, but Philadelphia. Atlantic City, New York, The 
Hudson river, Albany, Buffalo, and Niagara Falls are to be visited, and a full 
program of study and entertainment is to make every moment worth while. Be- 
gin at once to create a sinking fund for this grand tour." 

—KENTONIAN 



Page One Hundred-five 



toman s iFantltu, (tab 



OFFICERS 

Mrs. Ivins President 

Miss Meyer Secretary 

Miss Rider Treasurer 

Miss Elsie Mabee Vice President 

PROGRAM 

Corn Roast College Woods 

Miss Prentice '"Over There" 

Lecture "'Nutrition" 

Dr. Win. Champion 
Lakeside Hospital 

Lecture " Schools As An Industry ' ' 

Dr. W. C. Greer 
Akron, Ohio 

Miss Bess Rider "Life In A Geology Camp" 

Lecture "The Adolescent Girl 

Miss Marshall 
Woman Protective Association 

Musical Entertainment Miss Sliamel and Miss Bachman 

Theater Party in Cleveland — Playhouse 

The dinners were served by members of the various Committees. 

OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR 

Miss Verder President 

Miss Potdorf Treasurer 

Miss Adaline King Vice President 

Mrs. S. A. Harbourt Secretary 



Page One Hundred-six 



^ttor Jfax Hattrh 



} 

The old orchard on the Hall estate adjoining the campus of the college has 
been cleared away and on this site now stands one of the few large Black-Silver 
Fox Ranches in the United States. Provision was made for ranching one hund- 
red silver foxes which were imported from Prince Edward Island in the Gulf of 
the St. Lawrence River. The trained keeper who came from Prince Edward 
with the first shipment of foxes and who has assumed full charge of the breed- 
ing of the foxes here pronounces the new Kent Ranch the most commodious, 
sanitary and up-fo-date ranch in the country. 

These fine breeding foxes were specially selected from ranches on Prince 
Edward island by J. P. Duffus, of New 1'ork City, the most experienced man in 
the Silver Pox industry. He owns at 21 West 30th street, New York, the only 
wholesale house in the world which handles exclusively Silver Pox pelts. Dr. 
Duffus has a fifty per cent interest in the ranch here. He is heavily interested 
in ranches at Oleary and at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Holstein and 
Thamesville, Ontario, Canada, at Reading, Elizabethville, Bally and Chester 
Springs, Pennsylvania, at Gaylord, Michigan, and at Huntington, Long Island, 
lie is strongly impressed with the possibilities of the Kent ranch which he pro- 
nounces the best of all. 

LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE AT KENT STATE 

A Liberal Arts College at Kent State is one of the goals toward which Kent 
State is working. The recent bill introduced into the legislature provided that 
Bowling Green State Normal and Kent State Normal should he changed to 
Bowling Green College and Kent State College. It also provided that the 
boards of trustees of the schools should continue as boards of trustees of the 
college and authorized them the right to grant A. B. Degree as prescribed by 
Ihe Trustees. Although the bill failed to pass the legislature this year, we feel 
confident that Kent State will grant the A. B. Degree in the near future. 



Page One Hundred-seven 



£jJF£MY 



^nttor flmpiterij 



I adjusted the heavy volume which I had been laboring over for five hours. 
"Why had Mr. Chandler assigned me that long report on 'Reincarnation?' " I 
tried to review what I had read, the room swam before my eyes, something be 
gan turning in my head. A low hum sounded in the distance, gradually in- 
creased until the room resounded with a blast of trumpets. 

Suddenly before my astonished eyes stretched a long procession, at its head 
a gilded chariot bearing a royal figure in Egyptian robes, its head bent of a 
scroll of papyrus, behind it over the plain stretched a long train of slaves, each 
bent beneath the weight of similar scrolls. Ye Gods ! There is something in re- 
incarnation after all ! In the abstract eye of the monarch I distinctly saw the 
look of my classmate Lauramarie. 

Scarcely had the vision faded when a clamor arose beside me. Turning I 
saw a short figure in Greek garb philosophising before a crowd of bored Athen- 
ians. What a flow of words! Is it possible! My friend Ilogue. At the height 
of his harangue Xantippe appeared upon the scene. The crowd melted away in 
silence. As she seized the now subdued philosopher by the ear. she turned her 
face, and — Gerda ! The Scold ! How characteristic ! 

What is this I hear? "I am no orator as Brutus is!" W-h-a-t ! Mark 
Anthony! No it can't be — ! Still the oratorical tone, the flashing eye, the 
lofty brow — yes it is Frank Moore ! 

Before him lies the pathetic clay that had once housed the noblest soul in 
Rome. All harshness is smoothed from those classic features, familiar — what 
though the world called him Caesar — to us he is Lucien Black. 

A sudden mist obscured my eyes, when it cleared I beheld a barge, afloat 
"Purple the sails and so perfumed that the winds were lovesick with them." 
The figure reclining languorously upon the silken pillows was strangely garbed, 
but through all its barbaric splendor shown the seductive grace of one I well 
knew — Kathryn Grier, Even then men's hearts were shaken by her glance. 

A voice lifted in exhortation smote my ear. A figure in garb of Popery 
was haranguing a crowd of gaping rustics, promising them salvation for a fee. 



Page One Hundred-eight 



The voice was that of Tetzel but the indulgence was handed over with the same 
gesture with which Crilla Belle had so often passed me a 'hot dog". 

Instinctively my eye sought the door of the nearby cathedral. Yes. he was 
there, convulsively grasping his hammer driving home the nail that secured 
the ninety-five theses to the door, even now working to establish Lutheranism. 
!n history he may be Luther — to us he is Slough. 

My mind was hurried thence by a clanging of swords, and rumble of can- 
nonading. In the heart of the conflict, calm amid wreck of matter and the crash 
of worlds — stood out a figure, commanding, dominating the whole scene. I 
recognized the determined air, the eagle eye. Napoleon once, "Cookie" now! 

Thru the crash of battle stole a musical strain. Under its magic the tumult 
sank into nothingness. I beheld a figure seated before an old harpischord. The 
hands strayed across the keys — so gently, softly ! A plaintive Hungarian mel- 
ody floated to me. It was the same with which Abbe Liszt hail so often hushed 
the souls of men. The massive bead with leonine locks turned slowly. Not Liszt 
but Rose! Rose O'Connor! 

Suddenly a crashing chord leaped from the keys. I straightened in my 
chair, nursed the toe upon which the ponderous volume had fallen — and pro- 
ceeded in the preparation of my report. 



HOPE 

Thou noble inspiration of the world, 

Thou hast been found wherever men have trod. 
What though thy form in mystery is furled 

Thou art of Cod. 

By thee the good exists in spite of sin. 
Thou lil'test up the weary and oppressed. 

And thy life-giving spark is found within 
The sick man's breast. 

The stately edifices men have reared 

Are monuments erected unto thee. 
And tangled wildernesses have been cleared 

By thy decree. 

Thy rosy vision cheers the derelict, 
And leads the oft-defeated army on. 

That soul, indeed, is sorry to depict 
Where thou art gone. 

Buoyant Spirit ! Guiding Star of men, 
Through thee we dare to face Eternity. 

1 wonder if we'll see thv image when 



We cease to 



— Dwight Packard. 



Page One Hundred-nine 



i>nttnr &m\n, 



When mem'ry wings her wonted flights 

Back through the veil of years. 

Brings back forgotten faces, 

Brings back our joys and tears; 

When we sit alone in the twilight. 

And our thoughts are backward turned. 

When over again in fancied dreams. 

Live pasts in souls deep burned: 

When Time with his scythe has cut us down, 

When our eyes are dim and blurred. 

When we come to the end of life's long road 

And wait only the Master's word; 

Let us not forget in our musings 

Of friends both tried and true ; 

Let us not forget to give a thought 

On this class of the Gold and Blue. 

Oh hallowed class of Golden blue, 

Thy mem 'ry 's ever dear ; 

We'll not forget thee. Gold and Blue. 

Whose name we all revere. 

The time is growing close, alas. 

When we must say goodbye. 

As we take our leave to finish up 

Our dream castles in the sky. 

Our aims will not be reached, perhaps. 

Our star's perhaps too high; 

But our spirits ne'er will daunted be. 

And our hope will never die. 

We'll make our mark and not give in 

Till the struggle of life is through. 

We'll fight to the end and the world will hear 

Of this class of the Gold and Blue ; 

In the Hall of Fame her standards shall rest, 

Willi her colors of Gold and Blue; 

And the world of tomorrow will echo the praise 

Of this class of the Gold and Blue. 

H. S. 



Page One Hundred-ten 



(Elj? Qltesttmt 



Finding it necessary to make a journey consuming several hours of time 
and becoming tired of reading and watching familiar passing scenery, the 
traveler turned his attention to the other occupants of the car. 

There was a man who, judging- from his brief case and perfect ease of 
manner was a traveling salesman. He spent most of the time napping. Just 
across the aisle was a young lady of the rather flashy type, eager to attract at- 
tention to herself. A young couple — newlyweds, as evidenced by their action 
and conversation — who seemed entirely unaware of all others, completed the 
list with but one exception. 

This exception was a carefully dressed woman of middle age, quite evi- 
dently a spinster. She wore a small, close-fitting hat under which her gray 
hair was very plainly arranged. On the lapel of her severely tailored suit was 
pinned a small, pink rose-bud. 

As the journey progressed one became aware of increased nervousness on 
her part. She watched stations and seemed to experience relief each time the 
train moved on. Then as the town of C — was called, the lady gathered together 
her possessions and prepared to depart. Gradually the train slowed down and 
finally stopped. The passenger left the train and was greeted on the station 
platform by a man. who was neither young nor old, and who wore a small pink 
rose bud in the button hole of his coat. 

These two met as people will when uncertain as to exact identity. As the 
train pulled out the last glimpse of this strange couple revealed them climbing 
into a rather delapidated Ford and driving away in the direction of town. 

The question in the mind of the traveler was, "Did the spinster answer a 
matrimonial advertisement .'" 

—Mabel E. Edwards, '23. 



JUNIOR POEM 
We're not a bit stingy with our pep 

The students will all agree. 
For whether it's work, or whether it's play. 

We're the all-'round Juniors of '23! 

Here many friendships we have formed. 

And some are old, some new, 
We hope through all the years to come, 

They'll e'er stand firm and true. 

Our faculty's the best there is. 

You can search the wide world o'er. 
From a store of knowledge, they give to us. 

All that they know, and more. 

We've attended the parties and dances, 

Where good times are in store for all; 
We'll never forget the fun we've had. 

At dear old Moulton Hall. 

And now in the closing lines, Kent State 

We ask you to hear this plea: 
••Though, far apart our ways may lead 

Remember the Juniors of '23." 

Eleanor Douglas. 



Page One Hundred-eleven 



Dear Jim Riley : 

I borrowed this from you. I didn't take away much or I didn't add much 
to. Folks understand when God made you He took a year or two. For me He 
prob'l took an hour and then He was all thru. I couldn't write a poem to tit 
my teacher here. So I took "Old Fashioned Roses", for I knew you wouldn't 
care. Louise Fenton. 

There ain't much style about him. 

And he's sort of gray and faded. 

Yet 23 without him 

Would be lonesomer, and shaded 

With a good deal blacker shadder 

Than each cloudy morning brings. 

And each English face look sadder 

Without his "Bill Nye" flings. 

AVE like him 'cause he kinda 
Sort of makes a student like him, 
And I tell you if we speak a 
Thought that happens just to strike him. 
His head begins a noddin' 
At the one that answered so, 
"That's right." he speaks out slowly. 
And his eyes shine, don't you know. 

And then we think of Heaven. 
Just as here folks there will love him. 
And there isn't any other 
That will sit in rows above him. 
They'll make him head of English, 
For no other 'd suit so well. 
With Packard for our Teacher 
We'd be happy down in Purgatory. 

But as we were a sayin '. 

There aint much style about him 

Very showy or displayiif 

Yet we wouldn't be without him, 

And he's happier pleasin students. 

Just us common folks and sich. 

Than a President or a Governor 

That caters to the rich. 



Shakespeare was an ocean 

Splashing all the shores of thought 

Each wave had perfect motion 

And with perfect pearls was fraught. 

'Tis this way with ev'ry poet 

That ever has been named: 

Their splash is just as great 

As the poet they contained. 

Folks, don't miseonfuddle. 

We do not write for cash ; 

We're nothh'g but a middle 

lint we'll make our little splash ! 



Page One Hundred-twelve 



SUCCESS 

Success is a thing 

of which poets sing 
In accents romantic and grand ; 

its laurel is placed 

On a stern and grim face 
"Who rule with a mighty mailed hand. 

We've long- held the thought. 

And ever been taught 
That to "WIN is the ultimate aim; 

Some gain victory 

By chicanery. 
Some plunder and murder and maim. 

Success is not found 

In Mammon's bright crown. 
Nor yet in the stern martial van, 

It is not something real, 

But a thing that you FEEL— 
It exists in the HEART of a man. 

The highest success 

A man can possess 
Comes in doing the best that he can, 

If he's sparing no pains — 

Though he's making no gains, 
He is a success as a man. 

You may enter a race 

With a confident face. 
And win with ridiculous ease; 

But your victory has cost 

More than if you had lost. 
If you suffered your stride to decrease. 

You may do a thing well. 

And your proud bosom swell. 
And 'tis true you've outdistanced the rest — 

Yet, what ever you do. 

You're a failure, if you 
Have not done your dead level best. 

C. Dwight Packard. 



DON'T QUIT 
Life is queer with its twists and turns. 
As every one of us sometimes learns, 
And many a failure comes about 
When you might have won. had you stuck it out. 
Don't give up though the pace seems slow: 
You may succeed with another blow. 
Success is failure turned inside out — 
The silver tint of the clouds of douht. 
And you never can tell how close you are; 
It may be near when it seems afar. 
So stick to the fight when you're hardest hit — 
It's when yon have failed you may quit. 

— Paul Yarman. 



Page One Hundrei-ihirieen 



Kxb lags 



What fun 'twould be to be again sweethearts like we were then. You in 
the fourth grade, me in the first; loving each other for better or worse. How 
stiff we are now and how free we were then. Wouldn't you like to go back there 
again? But we never return to the days that have been. Dear me. no. We 
soon will be women and men. I can see yon yet with your tnrned-up nose and 
the muddy shoes with the turned-in toes. And those great brown freckles all 
over your face. Oh, gee, but then I had awful taste Von had such a winsome, 
awkward grace, and your nails were as black as the spade of an ace. Your hair 
was as yellow, my sweet Saxon fellow, as unpulled taffy or lemon jello. And 
was 1 much of a picture? I wonder. Oh. no! They called us the lightning and 
thunder. Because of my temper, because of your hair, they called us the 
thundering lightning pair. Oh, neither was 1 a picture, though with my hair 
bobbed short and my nose turned so, and my mouth flew open whenever Id' 
iaugh, till you'd think my whole face was diminished by half. You remember 
the day we went fishing? We two. I couldn't keep still, but neither could you. 
And finally you said, "Now listen to this. You know that your mouth was just 
made to kiss." I was thrilled. I was scared. 1 pulled off my shoe. I snatched 
it right off and threw it at you. I threw it so hard, it really was shocking, then 
walked home alone and got burrs in my stocking. At last, in my teens, I grew 
to In- a Freshman, you still ahead of me. Those high school days were truly 
line, when we knew just enough to have a good time. Today (I'm sorry) 1 
no longer like you as I did when 1 sat on your bike, and rode with you up aud 
down hill. Then you were my .lack and I was your Jill. The coasting days 
and the skating place, oh, I haven't the time or yet the grace to write the fun 
thai we used to do, when you liked me and when I liked you. When you worked 
my Trig., and I, your stories, and the notes we'd pass, and the sleigh ride glories. 
Oh ! Those glad kid days one never forgets, from the sugar bush to the violets. 
This is the way love always does, tries to please the one it loves. But the day 
came when my love did leave. The time you proposed, on New Year's Eve. 
At first I w r as sorry, but now I've no doubt that my heart's far better inside me 
than out. But love unrequited is sweeter than when some kid day passion 
has reached its end. Time changes so, it changes how? What we love as kids, 
we love not now. But why am I writing all this here, w-hen I'm getting so old 
in a college year? I'd better stop writing this foolish junk and study my books 
or else I'll flunk. Keep the sweet past, yet hurry on. Love Kid Days still 
but look beyond. 

—J. L. Y. P. 



Page One Hundred-fourteen 



At % lull feme 



My husband, still a bridegroom, called me on the phone, one day, 

"The Indians and the White Sox," he said, "are going to play. 

So put on your wedding gown and comb out your bobbed locks. 

And we'll go to see the Indians beat those White Chicago Sox." 

I donned my new spring bonnet and all my prettiest clothes. 

Some new, white buckskin oxfords and my lovely, white silk hose. 

We hurried to our places, the game had just begun; 

Some other folks had rushed for they were talking about a run. 

I turned to Willie and I said, "What makes them jump and howl?" 

And Willie said, "Why, don't you see, that White Sox hit a fowl." 

Could you imagine anything more trifling or absurd, 

Than for them with that big stick they swing to strike a little bird? 

Then suddenly a lightning crack. How those ball fans did shout ! 

i was so seared, "What's happened now? What is it all about?" 

"Why, don't you see," he said to me, "that Indian caught a fly, 

if it had slipped away from him. I guess that I would die." 

"'Fraility, thy name is man," I uttered with a sigh, 

"To stop right in a game of ball to kill a little fly. 

But then I do suppose with all the flings and curves, 

A little buzzing fly sort of would get on their nerves. 

I sat gazing at the hats, for the hall game was a bore, 

While Willie gazed at swinging bats, and cussed and shrieked and ,;wore 

He'd get so excited, he'd jump from out his seat 

When an Indian stole a base or some such silly feat. 

At last he got so roused, he climbed to the highest row. 

Forgot his bride was by his side, well, then 1 felt de trop. 

Then suddenly they all began to scream and dance and holler, 

When I looked up at Willie, he had taken off his collar, 

And as I looked up at him. my heart strings played a moan. 

As excitedly he shouted, "Hey ! Kid, come on home." 

I was so mad. Oh ! so indignant, but I clambered up the step, 

I felt so mortified, I could have fought or wept. 

My husband's coarser nature, his infinite lack of tact 

1 'd never seen, I thought before no virtue did he lack. 

Till he cried before those people, "Go back, you fool, go back." 

As I clambered down again, my feet somehow got tripped. 

And Willie cried, "Slide, fool, why slide." Oh, how the laughter ripped. 

A situation certainly becoming to a bride. 

Most every man in that grand stand was shouting, "Slide, kid, slide." 

If only from tin- public gaze my being could be hid, 

But with the balance left to me, believe me folks, I slid. 

Willie, getting gallant, reached finally my side. 

"Why are they yelling at me and laughing so?" I cried. 

Absentmindedly he turned and smoothed my chestnut locks. 

And gazing straight beyond him. sadly murmured, "The White Sox." 

■'Well, what's the matter with them!" I touched my lovely hose. 

T was angry as Xanthippe or Rip's wife when he'd doze. 

Most half the fans in that grand stand like a million crowing cocks, 

Yelled, "Look at them, look, the White Sox, Sox, Sox." 

To me it was a tragedy that I could see no fun in. 



J 



Page One Hundred-fifteen 



Said Willie sad, "The White Sox, dear, have got a ran in." 

"The White Sox, they've got a ran," those rude men screamed in glee, 

And no one blushed and while they yelled they did not look at me. 

And as we journeyed home that night, Bill didn't even grin. 

He only cussed the white sox, and the run that they'd got in. 

"Gosh darn it, if those White Sox only hadn't got that ran." 

In vain I tried to soothe him, but those sox had killed his fun. 

Next time I'll wear some strong hose tho' they do not look so well. 

I'll liny some thick, dark lisle ones, like those that Gensemer's sell. 

— J. Louise Fenton 

Mb fou Wnglj f ottrsrlt? 

In many public places, we see a sign, "Did you weigh yourself today?" 
So, we are minded to ask, "Have you weighed yourself today, in relation to 
your job, and if so, how did you size up with the requirements?" 

The story of any successful man's life is the story of mind development, 
courage, industry, enthusiasm, patience, and determination. It is entirely and 
solely up to you, whether you will remain a follower or become a leader, 
whether you will lie a mental cripple or an intellectual giant. Every position 
presents numerous opportunities for personal development, and the material 
with which men may develop. 

A ' ' Light-weight ' ' is all right in his own class, but he seldom does any- 
thing outside of it. Even in his proper division, a "Light-weight" is seldom 
successful unless he carries a good, stout "punch" in either glove. On the other 
hand, a man may weigh a few hundred pounds, physically, and still be more 
interesting than important. The big thing which overshadows the rest, is this: 

How much do you weigh, mentally? Have you initiative, creative ability, 
vision, imagination — nerve? Have you plenty of "pep?" Do you try to do a 
little more and a little better work today than you did yesterday or last week? 
Or, do you continually watch the clock, kill time, worry about the weather and 
do just enough work to get you by? Are you an eighteen karat staller. or a 
quick-thinking, rapid-moving, live-wire? Weigh yourself. 

' ' The fellow who never does any more than he is paid for, seldom gets paid 
for more than he does." It doesn't take loug to spot the clock watchers in any 
organization. 

If any member of a group does not give his group the best he has in him. 
then he is not an ideal member of the group. Your best means just that — not 
pretty good, nor good enough, but best — and to deliver it. you have to keep 
hustling about sixty seconds every minute. Of course, it can be done. Every- 
body is pulling for you to come through a winner. Are you coming ? Or are 
you going to quit on the road? Remember. "If you are not on the road, you are 
in the road," and do your best. 

— L. Janice Moore 



Page One Hundred-sixteen 




ftf-IIJEM 




Page One Hundred-scvcnlcen 




Page One Hundred-eighteen 



Mortal QIahmbar 



September : 

18 — Opening! "Ye olde acquaintences. " Handclasps! Lost: some- 
where between Merrill and Science Halls — new students. Welcome 
new Dean. Miss Verder. Meeting of former Kent State girls with 
the Dean. 

19 — "On with the dance — let joy he nncontined." Party of welcome to 
new Kentonian girls by former girls. Speeches I Good will! Friend- 
ships ! 

22 — "Give me some of that bread — and. oh. you weiners." Hot dogs! 
Help yourself. Marshmallows. THE CORN ROAST. Highlight! 
Stump speech by the Dean! Songs! Pep! 

23 — Hike ! Twin Lakes ! College girls. Knickers ! Eats ! 

24 — ' ' Every! lody step ; 

Hold to your partner and 

( latch that rhythm. 

Dance, take a chance, 

And step right with him." 

"Him" — .' The football player, of course, for the team is a 

special guest at this college dance at Moulton Hall. 

25 — Mr. Yeo argues. 

30— Team Rah! Team Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Team! Did we 
play? You bet we did! Where — Alliance. Ohio. Who — Mount 
Union College. How — Pus. 

October : 

1 — Students commence to study. 

10 — Big sister Tea. Little girls, big little girls, and little big girls, 
hairribbons. sandwiches, music, tea. funny costumes. "Irresistible, 
irrepressible, irresponsible giggles," n' everything. 

11 — "Every dog has his day." First dog visitor in Education class. 
Dog comes in — wags his tail. Dog meanders around between rows, 
still wagging his tail. Dog happy — students appreciative. DOC 
EXITS SUDDENLY— taif does not wag. 

12 — Anniversary of discovery of America. Some aspire to be a Colum- 
bus. Most of students rather not. Anyway Columbus did not go to 
Kent State. 

14 — All student party at Moulton Hall. 

18 — Faculty Club dinner at Moulton. Such eats! Moulton Hall girls 
green with envy. 

20 — Halloween party of Home and School association. Pumpkins ! 

21 — Party — College section. Japanese decorations. Beau Brummels ! 

27 — High School Party. Dancing in the foyer. Lucky is she with a 
High School man. 

28 — Mr. Yeo argues on. 

November : 

4 — "Bluebird bring back my happiness to me." Senior Normals joy- 
ously use the bluebird of happiness to make their dance a success. 
8 — Tea by Dean of Women to Kent landladies at Moulton Hall. The 
three "R's. " Rules! Regulations! Restrictions! 
10 — High School Party. Dancing ( ?) — in foyer. 



Page One Hundred-nineteen 



11 — Armistice Day. The fighting spirit of 1776 was evidenced on the 
football field between Kent State and Bowling Green. After the 
fight — the dance. 

14 — Assembly by committee of State. 

16 — Faculty Club dinner. Oh those fifteen course dinners n' every- 
thing. 

17 — A carnival dance the Juniors tried, 
And strung up colored balloons, 

Along came the guests 

Boom ! Boom ! 

18 — Thanksgiving vacation — and turkey ! 

27 — College convenes. Studies resumed (?). 

28 — Women's League program in Assembly. 

29 — Anne Lewis suggests a benefit show for the AVomen's League. 

December : 

5 — Book of Job played in College auditorium. A serious thought 

sandwiched in with the frivolities of college life. 
7 — Education week celebrated by speeches in assembly by Reading 20 

class. 
8— The sale ! The sale ! Oh why that wait :> The Y. W. girls need the 

money, from what we have heard, it turned out a "bird," for the 

bus sure did bring home the honey. 
12— That Reading 20 dinner 

Sure did prove a winner 

With speeches and toasts 

And Miss Verder as "host "(ess) 

We wished that we might be an inner. 
13 — By candle light, the serenaders 

Sang Christmas hymns of old; 

The spirit of our Dean and Students 

AVas shown this night fourfold. 
14 — Christmas Assembly. 
15 — The homeward trend, 

The term's at an end!! 

And we don't wish to insinuate. 

But cranberries sweet 

As a dessert and a meat. 

We'll tell mother dear to eliminate. 

January -. 

1 — Back once more to the same old grind, 
Back to the books of old. 
Back to — but we don't care 
For friends and fun are waiting there. 
5 — The 0. C. girls are far from "off," 

Their party at Moidton was quite the "gauf." 
7 — Skating at Brady Lake. That moon beamed — 
And that ice just gleamed. 
12 — Junior class party. 

18 — Annual Board gives part of program in assembly. 
22 — A treat for Kent Staters! Mr. Dumesnil — pianist — gave us a 
concert in the College auditorium. 



Page One Hundred-twenty 



27 — "Oh— where are you going pretty maid in your calico apron so 
fine ? 
To the Normal Senior Party — Get in line! 
28 — Mr. Yeo prepares a new argument. 
February ■. 

3 — That college men's dance made Mae Murray and old Jazzmania 

feel like fools. 

Moonlit waltzes. 
10 — Basketball game. 
14 — Valentine Day ! 
15 — Skit show! School hooks put away for paint and powder. High 

class show. Fashion show. Prima Donnas and grocery store. 
Hi — Junior High party. 
17— More basketball. 
20 — On our way home from Lowry. 

It's an old. old story 

To take a good look through the window 

At the good things to eat — 

The faculty's treat! 

But — we'll be there some day, by gorrv ! 
21— Basketball. 
26 — Junior High School play. 
28 — Vacation until March second. 



March 



April: 



1 — Lecture on Alaska by Edgar Paine. The (). ('. girls went "over 

the top" with this concert. 
2 — Back at lesssons ! Maybe wisdom is more precious than anything 

else and also most desirous — lint — "Oh how I bate to get up in 

the morning." 
7 — Senior High Play. Senior Normal Fornml .' 
10 — "Furbellows and laces, 

Furs and frills and graces, 

Vanities of women fair 

Combs and flowers for her hair." 
11— •• After the Ball is Over." 
16 — Term ends. 
17 — Faculty Women's farewell party to the seven girls leaving in 

March. The Dean, pretty girls, sofl lights, seven courses, speeches. 

songs, and almost — tears. 
19 — Term opens. 
20 — Birthday party in the Lowry dining room for all girls whose 

birthdays were in June. July or August. Program, much fun. 

candles. 
23 — Impromptu Moulton Hall party. Song and dance 

1— Easter. 

5 — Brown Glee Club. Musical program in Kent State Auditorium. 
Oh — those banjos and — boys!!!!!! Reception and dance at Moul- 
ton Hall afterwards.. 
Finals for popularity contest. 
Miss Pose O'Connor— THE GIRL! 
Mr. Edgar Slough— THE BOY! 






Pane One Hundred-twenty-one 



May : 



June : 



7 — Y. W. C. A. Costume party. Games, costumes, powdered hair, 
flowers, dancing. Minuet. 
10 — Birthday party at Lowry for the "Birthday Girls." 
11— Y. W. C. A. meeting. 
14_Moulton Hall Girls Formal. 
17 — Another Birthday party. 
20 — Junior class informal. 
21 — Faculty Women's party. 
24 — Women's League assembly program. 
25 — Spring fever ! 
27 — Half of the term gone ! 
28 — College section dance. 



1 — Birthday party. 
7 — Musical number in Auditorium. 
Mr. Granville — baritone. 



8 — Mr. Yeo wins an argument. 
9— COMMENCEMENT ! 



Page One Hundred-tzuenty-tv.o 



FISH'S OPINION 
You can't blame 'em. Rouge covers a multitude of years. 
Few girls marry for money, but they find it rather easy to love a rich 



BUSINESS MGR. NOTICE 
The mosquito is a good sport among creditors, he always sings out 
warning before presenting his bill. 



THE WORST IS YET TO COME 
A Kent State graduate fainted on his way to his wedding, 
happen to him when he begins getting his wife's bill? 



What wil 



HINT FOR THE DIETITIAN 

A glass of milk three times a day and a good hearty laugh between meals 
will increase the avoirdupois of any normal individual. 



USE YOUR OWN 
A group of students were ridiculing a certain Prof's jokes, when the 
certain Prof happened on the scene. "'Young men," said he indignantly. 
"I'll have von to understand that my humor is not to lie laughed at!" 



■'A DIETITIAN'S APPRECIATION" 
"How dear to my heart is the Kent State boarder. 

Who pays in advance at the birth of "four weeks;" 
Who lays down her cash and does it quite gladly, 

And enters my office with no tears on her cheeks. 

How welcome her money when it reaches my sanctum ; 

How it makes my pulse throb; how it makes my heart dance. 
] outwardly thank her, I inwardly bless her — 

The Kent State boarder who pays in advance." 

— Anonvmous. 



"ABSENT MINDED 

Miss Smith, our nurse was walking 
Down the street one day. 

In absent minded stalking 

Toward a sign she chanced to stray. 

Some people don't believe in signs. 

But this one's pretty good, 
"Come in and have a shine," it read. 

So Miss Smith decided she would. 

She calmly climbed into a chair 

And started in to muse. 
In looking down upon her feet 

Was the oddest pair of shoes ! 

One was brown, and one was black ! 

A terrible situation, 
I'll bet Miss Smith was wishing 

She was somewheres on a vacation. 
But everybody makes mistakes ; 

The world is full of jokes, 



But there's no one who would ever 
have wanted 
To lie in Miss Smith's "boats." 
(By permission of poetic license.) 

DISILLUSION 

Her haii- 
Was bobbed 
And soft 
And curly ; 
I loved her. 

One day 

It rained 

And we 

Got 

In the wet. 

Ye Gods ! 
What did 
I ever see in her. 

Boll Wevil. 



Hundrcd-twenty-three 



To 
ANN LEWIS, whose honest and untiring efforts have made the following 
pages 01 jokes possible ; and whose enthusiasm has inspired us even in her 
absence, we, her humble assistants, do hereby dedicate this part of the 102:3 
Chestnut Burr. 

A PRIZE WINNING DESCRIPTION 

A soft brown hat. 
Overcoat to match. 
Believe me, girls. 
He's Kent State's "catch." 

He comes to class late, 
Face fused with blushes, 
He commences the lesson, 
With his glasses he fusses. 

At the Kent State "Games," 
His knees he pounds, 
And rolls his gum 
All over the ground. 

He's said to be handsome, 
And he's six feet tall, 
We surely do laugh 
At liis "blue grass drawl." 

He keeps us quite busy 
Gathering "dater" 
To make us good teachers, 
To Thorndike he'll cater. 

He'll call you in class 

If he thinks you're not working, # 

Makes you feel like a nickel 

For the lesson you're shirking. 

His ideal woman? 
I suppose she must be tall 
For the short little "miss" 
Isn't in it at all. 

And her hair should be dark 
Am I guessing her right'? 
Oh, why then P. G.? 
Do you excuse the light !!!!!! 

Perhaps it's because 
Some are naturally smart, 
But for "crying out loud" 
Won't you please have a heart? 

And excuse me for once ! 
Just for a change. 
Just to see how it feels 
To be out of your range. 

Helen Shattuek. 



Page One Hundred-twenty-four 





s 







Page One Hundrcd-twenty-fivc 







Page One lluntidred-twcnty-six 



SEVEN WOULD BE WONDERS OF THE WORLD 

1. Mr. Beck convinces Mr. Olson. 

2. Mr. Adrail Cook— silent, 

3. Mr. Hogue forgets to read an article. 

4. Mr. Yeo does not argue. 

5. Miss West wears the same dress twice. 

6. Miss 'Conner was unpopular. 

7. Mr. Stopher forgets a name. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE DAILY REGISTER 



Date 

10/2 

10/7 

10/23 

11/6 

11/27 

12/9 

2/14 

2/28 

3/5 

3/10 

3/20 

4/6 



Name 

Miss West 
Corrinne Ledger 
Dorris Riketts 
Edna Sawtel 
Crilla B. Thomas 
Marjorie Andrews 
lona Shepherd 
Mary Hissed 
Winegene Wood 
Clarice Moore 
Marckelle Pailor 
Miss West- 



Place 

Show 

Show 

Show 

Show 

Lowry Hal 

Walk 

Show 

Show 

Show 

Show 

Show 

1 )ance 



Time 
saving Returning 



7:00 
7:15 
7:15 
7:15 
7:15 
7:15 
7:15 
7:15 
7 :15 
7 :15 
7:15 
7:15 



10 :00 
10:00 
10:00 
10:00 
10:00 
10:00 
10 :00 
10:00 
10:00 
10:00 
10:00 
12 :00 



Escor 
Willard (*. 
Willard C. 
Willard C. 
Willard ('. 
Willard C. 
Willard C. 
Willard C. 
Willard ('. 
Willard C. 
Willard C. 
Willard C. 
Willard C. 



t 

I tryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

I !n an 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 



HOTEL FRANKLIN OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

Board 50 cents per sq. ft. Meals extra. 

Breakfast at 5, dinner al (i. supper at 7. 

Guests are requested not to speak to the dumb-waiter. 

Guests wishing to gel up without being called can have self-raising flour 
for supper. 

Not responsible for diamonds, bicycles or any other valuables kept under 
pillows; they should be deposited in the safe. 

"Bicycle" playing cards kepi on sale at the office; but country visitors 
are requested not to play any game more exciting than "Old Maid" after 7 
P.M. as their noise may disturb the night clerk's slumbers. 

The hotel is convenient to all cemeteries. 

Hearses to hire at 25 cents a day. 

Guests wishing to do a little driving will find hammer and nails in the 
closet. 

If the room gets too warm, open the windows and see the fire escape. 

If you're fond of athletics and like good jumping, lift the mattress and see 
the lied spring. 

Base-ballists desiring a little practice will find a pitcher on the stand. 

If the lamp goes out, take a feather out of the pillow; that's light enough 
for any room. 

Anyone troubled with nightmare will find a halter on the bedpost. 

Don't worry about paying your bill; the house is supported by its founda- 
tions. 

(The above "RULES FOR OCCUPANTS" are handed to every visitor 
on leaving the Hotel.) 



Page One Hundrcd-twcnty-seven 



THE GALOSH BRIGADE 

They're open 

And why not? 

They're too warm closed. 

They flap 

And why not ? 

They're ears for our toes. 

They're collegiate 

And why not ? 

So everyone knows. 

Why girls 

Wear galoshes 

To cover holes in their hose ! 



RULES FOR THE CLASS ROOM 

1 — Always come late to class. It makes you conspicuous. 

2 — Pass notes frequently. Kent needs training in football pass work. 

3 — Look wise, good training for the dumb-bell. 

4 — Do your best to talk and make noise, teacher loves to exercise her vocal 

cords. 
5 — Keep an eye on the clock while it's going, it might walk out sometime. 
6 — Appreciate the prof's humor, it shows intelligence. 
7 — Always park your gum in the same place. It saves confusion. 
8 — All talk at once ; we like practice for the chorus work, 
i) — Never lie prepared on Monday; too great a shock for the teacher. 
10 — Pitch paper in the basket; basketball season is coming. 

— KENTONIAN. 



WHAT DID YOU SEE? 

Caroline Russell eating pie with her knife. 

Erma Mavinelli hunting chestnuts under an umbrella. 

Clarice Moore cleaning her room at 11 :00 P.M. 

Margaret Stewart pulling a mouse out of the radiator by the tail. 

Corrine Ledger dancing with a girl. 

Mary G. not looking for a man. 

Mr. Slough and Annabel at the Formal. 

Pat lonesome on a spring day. 

Miss Smith doing pathetic dancing. 

Four College boys giving a serenade. 



A MUSICAL COMEDY 

The reason Rose is the most popular girl, is because everyone loves her 
touch. 

The girls don't like Red because he fiddles around too much. 

Mr. Read (taking Lowry Hall picture) — I wish that little girl in the center 
of the front row wouldn't roll her eyes that way. 

(A wise suggestion — refer to page 91.) 

Janice Moore (In Ed. 13) — I've explained that as clear as mud. 

Mr. Chandler — Well, that covers the ground, doesn't it? 

Mr. Black — How did I ever get on the Annual Staff? 

Tommy — Because you are the only Normal man in the class. 



Page One Hundred-ttoenty-eiffht 



BAD SIGN 
Wanted to exchange an $85 diamond ring for a gun. 

T. G. Robson. 
Mr. Byrne — This dance is like an elevator. 
Miss Wegman — How's that? 
Mr. Byrne — There are no steps. 



QUESTIONS THAT WE WISH OUR PROFS WOULD ASK 
1 — English is the study of what language? 
2 — What language do the French speak? 
3 — How long did the Seven Years War last ? 
4 — What nationalities fought in the French-Indian War ? 
5 — What was George Washington's surname? 
6 — What is the Eighteenth Amendment? 
7 — Why isn't east west? 



AX AUTOBIOGRAPHY 

My father's name was Handsome till he saw me. Then he immediately 
manged it to Hansen. 

Gerda Hansen, — Bv Herself. 



A SLIP OK THE TONGUE 

Eloise (Coming home from Sunday School) — "I had the best time flirt — 
with the tree dwellers. 



AX EXTREME CASE 
"Is Frank Moore polite?" 

"Is he polite? Why, he even knocks at the class room door before he 
enters." 

Akron Man — I'll marry you on one condition. 

Marion B. — That's all right; I worked off four last term. 



THE LAW OF FREQUENCY 
The Dean (Absent-mindedly) writing a dinner invitation — "Failure to 
observe this notice will not be excused." 



A CHIP OF THE OLD BLOCK 

Jack Schiely arrived home from college with a jazz neck tie, bell-bottom 
trousers, etc. 

Father — You look like a darn fool. Jack. 

Later a friend of Jack's father said to Jack — Say, Jack, you look just 
like your father did when he was your age. 



WHO SHOULD DRAW THE SALARY? 
Mr. Rumold — Young man, do you know anything about this course? 
David B. — A little, sir, what would you like to know? 
Mr. Beck — Mr. Yeo seems to be very narrow in an argument. 
Mr. Crow — Xot at all. He admits there are two sides to every question — 
his and the wrong one. 

Florence Critz — What makes you so small? 

Thelma K — My mater fed me on canned milk and I am condensed. 



Page One Hundred-twenty-nine 




flPVfRTISEMENTS 



Page One Hundred-thirty 



KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 




THREE SUMMER TERMS 

APRIL 30 TO JUNE 9. JUNE 18 TO JULY 27. 

JULY 30 TO AUG. 31. 

KENT STATE LEADS 

The Summer Quarter enrollment— a total of 3653 on a six weeks basis — surpasses any 
other teachers' college except Columbia. The fine climate (unequalled for summer study), 
the variety and richness of the courses offered (two hundred in number), and the high 
grade of instruction available for teachers seeking practical methods of management and 
instruction have combined to put Kent State in the lead in summer term enrollment. 

UNPRECEDENTED INCREASE 

The enrollment for this Quarter in the last two years moved from 2601 to 3653— a gain 
of 1052. Sixty-six of Ohio's eighty-eight counties were represented in the student body. 

COURSES: For Superintendents and Principals: Teachers in the Elementary Schools 
and the Junior and Senior High Schools; Teachers in Rural Schools and in 
all Special Subjects. The Kent Demonstration School will offer opportunity for observa- 
tion and practice from the Kindergarten through the Junior and Senior High School. 

L AKESIDE ADVANTAGES: Many glacial lakes furnish fine fishing, boating and' 

bathing. The location of the college on the hill top 
surrounded by natural forest trees and near so many lakes explains the delightful climate 
at Kent during the summer months. 

SPECIAL FEATURE 

EDUCATIONAL TOUR FOR STUDENTS AND ALUMNI 
TEN DAY TRIP 

Including Washington, Philadelphia, Atlantic City, New York City, Hudson River. 
Catskill Mountains, Buffalo, Niagara Falls. 

TOTAL COST. $105.00. 
Covers Fare, Pullman, Hotel, Meals, Bus Service, Guides. 



Write for catalog and information to 

PRESIDENT J. E. McGILVREY, 
KENT, OHIO 









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Page One 


Hundred tin 


iy-ltvo 






— ! 







Olin's Quality Music Store 



The New Edison 

Pianos 

Players 
Grand Pianos 
Musical Goods 



135 E. MAIN ST. 




THE 

Shoppe 

Home Cooking 



Give Us a Trial 



G. R. Dixon 



Latest Hits 

Edison Records 

Gennett Records 

Sheet Music 

Player Rlolf 



KENT, OHIO 



Read 
Studio 

High Class Portraits 

Amateur Finishing 

All Classes of Com- 
mercial Photography 

129 EAST MAIN 
PHONE 226 KENT, OHIO. 



Page One Hundred-thirty-three 











"All the Clothing Necessities of the 
Well Dressed Man" 

CLOTHING. HATS, SHIRTS, NECKWEAR, SHOES, CAPS. 
ALSO LUGGAGE. 

KENT AKRON 


; 










BEAUTIFUL SHOES 

AT 

KENT'S EXCLUSIVE SHOE STORE 

The footwear presented is not only fascinating and representa- 
tive of the models being favored but the values, our ability to per- 
fectly combine artistic styles and genuine economy in the selling 
of shoes. 

Keds and All Rubber Soled Footwear for College Use 
118 N. Water St. Geo. T. Cook Kent, Ohio. 














' 


T. W. Darwell 

Cleveland News & News Leader 
Chicago Herald. Agency 

MAGAZINES 
CANDIES REFRESHMENTS 

134 East Main Street 




J. A. Custiss 

119 North Water Street 
Staple and Fancy Groceries 

Fruits & Vegetables 

Trade Here And Save Money 

(We sell any amount of anything) 

Delivery Service 

Phone 75 Kent, Ohio. 
















Harold Curtiss 

CONFECTIONERY & ICE 
CREAM 

HOME MADE CANDY 

Special Orders a Specialty 

Phone 52 138 N. Water St. 




J. A. Giggers 

GENERAL HARDWARE 
Stoves & Building Material 

Lowe Brothers 
Paints and Varnishes 















Page One Hundred-thirty-four 











THE BANK ON THE CORNER 






The Kent National Bank 






KENT, OHIO 






START A CHECKING ACCOUNT: 

Cultivate the Habit of Paying by Check, 
Whether Your Transaction be Large or 
Small, We Welcome Your Account. 

SAVE PART OF YOUR EARNINGS: 
You Know it is Wise to do so. We Pay 
4 r ( Interest, Compounded Semi-annually. 

SAFEGUARD YOUR VALUABLE 
PAPERS: We Rent Safe Deposit Boxes 
at Less Than One Cent, and up. Let us 
Show Them to You, as well as the Priv- 
ate Rooms We Provide for Your Use 
When Looking Over Your Papers. 

CAPITAL and SURPLUS $170,000.00 






DEPOSITS MORE THAN $1 360,000.00 






OFFICERS DIRECTORS 






P. W. Eigner, President M. B. Spelman 
J. G. Getz, Vice-President C. B. Hall 
G. J. Stauffer, Cashier G. J. Stauffer 
C. E. Hinds, Asst. Cashier J. G. Getz 

P. W. Eigner 











Page One fiundrcd-lhirty-five 















NONE BETTER 

KENT DRY CLEANERS 

ENERGINE 

Cleaning 

H. L. LIGHTNER, Mgr. 
Phone 12 226 S. Water St. 




Gibson & Ott 

RESTAURANT 

Cor. Main and Franklin 
Phone 124 Kent, Ohio. 
















COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOWARD YOUNG 

143 E. MAIN ST. KENT, OHIO 

Bicycles Sporting Goods Fishing Tackle 
Auto Accessories 'N Everything 











Page One Hundred-thirty-six 



THE CITY BANK 

KENT, OHIO 

Organized 1881 



ASSETS OVER $1,000,000 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 



4 % on Time Deposits 



OFFICERS 

H. H. LINE, Chairman of Board 
M. G. GARRISON, President 

D. L. ROCKWELL, Vice-President 

E. F. GARRISON, Secretary-Treasurer 
R. L. SAMPSELL, Assistant Treasurer 



Page One Hundred-thirty-seven 



NORMAL EXCHANGE 

Second Floor Science Hall 
Opposite Room 24 



BOOKS AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

SCHOOL STATIONERY and PENNANTS 

BY STUDENTS FOR STUDENTS 



The Women's Store 
GENSEMER BROS. 

KENT 



Dry Goods, Ladies Ready- to- Wear Garments, 
Ladies Footwear 



It is our desire to serve you by cashing your checks and in 
every way possible make your shopping one of the 

MANY PLEASANT MEMORIES OF KENT 



Page One Hundred-thirty-eight 



= 



Telephone 452 



LEO A. BIETZ, MGR. 

Imperial 
Dry Cleaning Co. 



Operating the Only Dry 

Cleaning Plant 

in Kent 



149 South Water Street 
KENT, OHIO. 



G. F. ELGIN 

Jewelers — Engravers 
Optometrists 
114. N. Water Street 
Make this your headquarters for 
Normal College Jewelry and Re- 
pairs 

We are the originators of the Kent 
Normal Seal. 



D. 


H. 


GREEN 


Cloth 


ing 


— Furnishings 


Men's 
Shoes 




Women's 
Shoes 


N 


srth 


Water Street 
KENT 



S. C. BISSLER 
& SON 

Complete 
HOME FURNISHERS 
FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

Invalid Car Service 

Grafonolas and Records 

Phone 530 

112-114 E. Main St. 
KENT, OHIO. 



THE KENT 
RESTAURANT 

156 North Water St. 

Come in and see us 
You will come again 

Shriver & Webster 

PROP'S 



Kent Electric 

139 S. Water 
If Electrical we have it. 

Consult us on all your 
Electrical needs. 

C. J. Smith E. C. Burkhardt 

Phone 587 



Page One llundred-tliirty-nine 



CARA NOME 

Most Distinctive Odor 

Creation of Langlois 

Master Perfumer. 




Face Powder $2.00 

Extract 3.02 

Toilet Water 3.50 
Talc 1.00 



Vanishing Cream .75 
Cold Cream .75 

Sachet 2.00 

Skin Cream 75 



Donahy's Drug Store extends a 
most cordial invitation to the students 
of Kent Normal College to make this 
their drug store. 

DONAGHY'S 

THE FRIENDLY DRUG STORE 



The Book Store 

The Student's Store 

The store that is your real friend. 

Make this your store when in need 
of School Supplies, Books Sta- 
tionery or Kodak Supplies. 

We develop and print pictures. 
Try us. 

Come in. You'll feel our welcome 

E. R. Steiner 

Two doors South of the Post Of- 
fice. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE PRINCESS 
LUNCH 



121 E. Main Street 
Phone 411 



Page One Hundred-forty 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 



Thompson's Drug Store 

(Main and East Water Sts. ) 



Where the Students Purchase their 

ART SUPPLIES TOILET ARTICLES 

NOTE BOOKS TEXT BOOKS 

AUTOMATIC PENCILS STATIONERY 

FOUNTAIN PENS ATHLETIC GOODS 

CANDY ICE CREAM 



'Not a mere drug store, \ but an institution based on 
Quality and Service." 



HALE B. THOMPSON 

Pharmacist 



Page One Hundred-forty-one 



KENT'S LEADING PLACE OF AMUSEMENT 

KENT OPERA HOUSE 

Highest Class Attractions, Perfect Order, Service, Refined and 
Attractive 

FEATURING FAMOUS PLAYERS, LASKY CORPORATION 
Associated-First-National Picture Also Including Good Comedy 

ALSO PRINCESS THEATRE ON MAIN STREET 

John Pain, Owner. Kent, O. 



I. p. 


HARGER 


128 


N. Water 


Street 


NOTIONS, CUT GLASS, HOSIERY 

CANDY, DISHES, ENAMEL 

WARE, TINWARE and 

TOYS 


Normal 


School 


Supplies 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



KneifePs Grocery 



KENT, OHIO. 



Hotel Franklin 

The Most Beautiful Town 
Hotel in America. 

KENT, OHIO. 



Fisher & Kemp 

113 South Water Street 
Phone 670 

DEALERS IN FRESH AND 
SMOKED MEATS 



Standard Electric Co. 




Opposite the Post Office 



L. A. WETMORE 

The Normal Jeweler 

Normal Jewelery and Watch and 
Jewelery Repair Specialist. 

We are on your way to school 

HOTEL FRANKLIN BLDG. 
E. Main. 



Page One Hundred-forty-two 



H. C. LONGCOY 



"GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 



For Your "Spreads" 

We suggest Longcoy's Home 
Cooked Cold Meats, College Inn 
Products in time. Sandwich fil- 
lings, Olives, Jams, Fancy Cakes, 
Fruits. Etc. 



124 SO. WATER ST. 
Opposite Post Office 



House Wiring — Electrical Appliances 
Motors Installed and Repaired 

Earl F. Francis 

ELECTRICIAN 



Phone 497 
143 N. Water St. 



Kent, O. 



MASON TIRES 

RIVERSIDE AUTO SUPPLY 

AUTO ACCESSORIES 
330 N. River St. Phone 601 



For a Better Dish 

of Ice Cream 

or Soda try 

TRORY'S 



DRUGS 
EASTMAN KODAKS 



Deserves its name — fulfills its fame 

"REAL LOAF BREAD" 

Baked By 

Wenhart's Bakery 



24 oz. 
French Pastries 
Home Made Pies 



REAL LOAF 
Special Cakes 
Made to Order 



Bell Phone 107 



Compliments of 
Dr. J. H. KRAPE 

Office Hours 4-5 College Hospital 
Monday and Thursday 



Compliments of 
DR. GERALD M. STEVENSON 



Page One Hundred-jorty-tlire 



MILK— CREAM— ICE CREAM 

The Perfection 
Dairy Co. 



Phone 341 



Kent. O. 



Comfort Station 
Barber Shop 

West Main St. Kent O. 

FACIAL MASSAGE 

Special Appointments After 6 :00 
P. M. 



Not only because it is customary but because we desire to voice our true feeling, 
we, the members of the 1923 Chestnut Burr Staff, take this opportunity to express our 
appreciation for all the services rendered in the production of this volume. 



(Hl^Btnut Burr Btuft '23 




REPRESENTATIVES. 

Senior Degree, N. McGee. Senior Normal, J. Proctor. College, 
J. Beck. Junior, Y. Lynn. Literary Editor, C. Pitkin. 



Page One Hundred-forty-four 



®lj? (EijpBttmt Mmt Olmtstttuttmt 
flrramblp 

We, the members of the 1923 Chestnut Burr STaff, believing that much work and 
much worry can be eliminated in the production of an Annual Book by the guidance 
of a definate set of rules, do hereby ordain and establish this Constitution for the 
government of future Chestnut Burr Staffs. 

Article I 
Election of Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager 

Section 1 : The Presidents of the Senior Degree Class ,and Senior Normal Class 
shall, not later than the second week of the Fall Term, appoint three 
members from their respective class to act as a Chestnut Burr Commit- 
tee. 

Section 2 : It shall be the duty of the Chestnut Burr Committee with the assistance 

of the faculty adviser, to elect the Editor-in-chief and Business Manager; 

these officers to be elected not later than ten (10) days after the ap- 
pointment of the Committee. 

Section 3 : The Editor-in-chief and the Business Manager must be selected from 
the Senior Degree Class and the Senior Normal Class. . In case the 
Editor-in-chief is elected from the Senior Degree Class, the Business 
Manager must be elected from the Senior Normal Class. If the Busi- 
ness Manager is elected from the Senior Degree Class, the Editor-in- 
chief must be elected from the Senior Normal Class. 

Article II 

Selection of the Staff. 

Section 1 : The Editor-in-chief shall appoint his own assistant (and all necessary 
associates. 

Section 2: The Business Manager shall appoint his own assistants. 



Page One Hundred-forty-fivc 



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